Château d'Yvoire

Yvoire, France

Built from 1306 during the village fortification by the Comte de Savoie Amédée V, Yvoire castle had a military goal to watch the navigation and control the road which linked Geneva to the high valley of the Rhône and to Italy.

For several centuries, the village of Yvoire was in the center of several strategic or religious wars between France, Bern, Geneva as well as the houses of Faucigny, Dauphiné and Savoie.

In 1591, a fire devastated the building which only found its shape back in the 20th century, when Félix Bouvier of Yvoire undertook several internal and external renovation works, like the roof and the watch towers setting in 1939.

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Address

Rue du Lac, Yvoire, France
See all sites in Yvoire

Details

Founded: 1306
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

www.yvoire-france.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joanna Simpson (5 months ago)
We stopped on our way to Annecy and I must say it was a beautiful experience. Spent there about 4 hours wondering around, the 5 sense s garden is a must see when visiting
Erwin Salosagcol (6 months ago)
Quaint chateau by the lake, truly a fairy tale experience not to be missed. It wasn't over the top, and a great example of a medieval chateau. In this small village, the vibe of the local castle truly captures the magic of this hamlet.
Ross Heaney (3 years ago)
Lovely medieval castle on the French side of Lake Geneva. Some lovely spots to take pictures. Can be quite touristy in Yvoire but worth a wander.
Shawn Zents (4 years ago)
What an amazing, very walkable town. Very friendly locals, beautiful shops, and food is incredible. I miss it already!
Melissa Warren-Garcia (4 years ago)
Very charming, even in winter. A lot of shops and restaurants were closed due to it being low season, but we had a nice stroll along the lake side and port.
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