Neu-Homburg Castle Ruins

Läufelfingen, Switzerland

Homburg or Neu-Homburg Castle was the seat of the Froberg family since the 13th century until it was destroyed in 1798. Count Hermann IV of Frohburg settled in 1240 in the Läufelfingen valley. The castle was built by Hermann. The Bishop of Basel acquired Homburg in 1303 and built a new castle with the mighty residential tower as the seat of his Vogts.

After the French Revolution, many of the rural people rebelled against the Basel government. During the night of 23rd to 24th January 1798 Homburg was burnt down. Later the ruin was auctioned for use as a quarry.

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Founded: c. 1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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