The Zytglogge is a landmark medieval tower in Bern. Built in the early 13th century, it has served the city as guard tower, prison, clock tower, centre of urban life and civic memorial.

Despite the many redecorations and renovations it has undergone in its 800 years of existence, the Zytglogge is one of Bern's most recognisable symbols and the oldest monument of the city, and with its 15th-century astronomical clock, a major tourist attraction. It is a heritage site of national significance, and part of the Old City of Bern, a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage site.

 

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    Founded: c. 1218
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    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org
    www.bern.com

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    4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Sin Fong Chan (2 years ago)
    The Zytglogge Visited 18/9/2019 The Zytglogge was built in the 13th century and serves as a guard tower, prison and a clock tower. This medieval tower can be seen from the far end of the street. A clock was first installed above the gate in the early 15th century, including a simple astronomical clock and musical mechanism. Zytglogge may be translated as Time Bell in English. It is the oldest monument and has become a landmark in Bern. My friends and I arrived at about 12 noon. On the hour at twelve, a dancing jester, parading bears and a gilded figure appeared.
    RAMPRASAD SRINIVASAN (3 years ago)
    Awesome terrific just walked from Berne railway station Picturesque street ever seen
    RAMPRASAD SRINIVASAN (3 years ago)
    Awesome terrific just walked from Berne railway station Picturesque street ever seen
    subodh iykkara (4 years ago)
    Nice old architecture with great time for a walk. Easy access from public transport.
    subodh iykkara (4 years ago)
    Nice old architecture with great time for a walk. Easy access from public transport.
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