Alvastra Monastery Ruins

Ödeshög, Sweden

French monks of the influential Cistercian order founded Alvastra Monastery in 1143. From Clairvaux in France, the monks brought modern methods of administration, technology and architecture to the province of Östergötland in Sweden. Alvastra Monastery is a distinct part of Östergötland's cultural landscape, and is open for visitors to follow the monks' medieval trail.

The district around Alvastra played an important role in the development of the Swedish Kingdom during the Middle Ages. The powerful dynasty of Sverker resided here. In fact, Sverker the Older has been described as the king of Sweden's East Geats as well as the ruler of the Swedes. It appears as if the Sverker dynasty brought about the establishment of the Alvastra Monastery and gave the original donation of land to the Cistercian monks.

The church is the heart of the vast monastery establishment. The western section and the southern transept gable with its sacristy are well preserved. The building material is limestone from Omberg, and its architecture is simple, in accordance with the order's decree against extravagancies. French masters, with the assistance of people from nearby, erected the structure. The local inhabitants adopted the new techniques, in particular stone-masonry, which was used in building parish churches.

Alvastra was Sweden's largest monastery in its heyday, and it flourished for nearly 400 years. But along with the reformation it was dissolved and the Crown retracted the monastery's land possessions. The Alvastra property was made into the Alvastra royal estate. The construction materials interested several building proprietors and were used in the making of Vadstena Castle and Per Brahe's buildings along Lake Vättern.

The ruins have been restored and preserved in several phases. An interdisciplinary research project was initiated during the summer of 1992, which investigated the monastery's role in the development of medieval statehood.

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Details

Founded: 1143
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

www.raa.se
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sander van helvoort (3 years ago)
Nice to visit while passing by, it's beautiful.
Grabbarna Hedin (3 years ago)
Very nice short stop. Toilettes was very clean and free of charge. Interesting historic place.
stefan norell (3 years ago)
Cool and intresting place well worth a vist!
Marcin Mikuszewski (4 years ago)
Really nice place. It's amazing to see ruins of this very old monastery.
gia vava (4 years ago)
Very nice monastery ruins. Not so frequently you can see that in Sweden. Recommended
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