Solomon's Stables

Jerusalem, Israel

Solomon's Stables was an underground vaulted space now used as a Muslim prayer hall at the bottom of stairs which lead down from the al-Aqsa Mosque, under the Temple Mount, to the base of the southern wall of the Temple Mount. Solomon's Stables are located under the southeastern corner of the Temple Mount, 12½ metres below the courtyard and feature twelve rows of pillars and arches. In December 1996 the Jerusalem Islamic Waq (an Islamic religious trust) converted the area into a prayer hall by adding lights and floor tiles, and renamed it the Marwani Prayer Hall.

The structure is most widely said to have been built by King Herod as part of his extension of the platform of the Temple Mount southward onto the Ophel. The Herodian engineers constructed the enormous platform as a series of vaulted arches in order to reduce pressure on the retaining walls. These vaults were originally storage areas of the Second Temple. A great deal of the original interior survives in the area of the Herodian staircases, although not in the area now renovated for use as a mosque. Visitors are rarely permitted to enter the areas with Herodian finishes.

The underground space for the most part remained empty except for the Crusaders period. The Crusaders converted it in 1099 into a stable for the cavalry. The rings for tethering horses can still be seen on some of the pillars. The structure has been called Solomon's Stables since Crusader times as a historical composite. 'Solomon's' refers to the First Temple built on the site, while the 'stables' refers to the functional usage of the space by the Crusaders in the time of Baldwin II (King of Jerusalem 1118-1131 CE).

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Details

Founded: c. 0-30 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Israel

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Raza Shah (19 months ago)
This praying area, which is underground and on the south-east side of the al-Aqsa compound is the Marwan-e-Masjid and has recently been restored. When the Crusaders had control of the mosque they used to use this area as stables for their horses and it became known as Solomon’s stables. Holes can be seen on the base of many of the columns which were made by the Crusaders to thread rope to tie their horses. It is estimated that 400 horses were kept here at one time.
Wael AlMomani (21 months ago)
Important Masjid, underground.
Shams Manzari (2 years ago)
I like this Al Marwani Mosque
Imran Jadwat (2 years ago)
Tranquil, beautiful masjid
Alsu (2 years ago)
Huge praying room under the temple mount, it's very cold since it's underground but beautiful.
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