Hurva Synagogue

Jerusalem, Israel

The Hurva Synagogue is a a prominent landmark of the Jewish Quarter in Jerusalem. The synagogue was founded in the early 18th century by followers of Judah heHasid, but it was destroyed by Muslims a few years later in 1721. The plot lay in ruins for over 140 years and became known as the Ruin, or Hurva. In 1864, the Perushim rebuilt the synagogue, and although officially named the Beis Yaakov Synagogue, it retained its name as the Hurva. It became Jerusalem's main Ashkenazic synagogue, until it too was deliberately destroyed by the Arab Legion after the withdrawal of Israeli forces during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War.

After Israel captured East Jerusalem from Jordan in 1967, a number of plans were submitted for the design of a new building. After years of deliberation and indecision, a commemorative arch was erected instead at the site in 1977, itself becoming a prominent landmark of the Jewish Quarter. The plan to rebuild the synagogue in its 19th-century style received approval by the Israeli Government in 2000, and the newly rebuilt synagogue was dedicated on March 15, 2010.

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Details

Founded: 1856/2010
Category: Religious sites in Israel

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nachum Applbaum (2 years ago)
Visitors to the rebuilt synagogue can admire the special beauty of its interior, view the world’s tallest Holy Ark (which contains the synagogue’s Torah scrolls) and hear the fascinating story of the Hurva Synagogue. They can see history with their own eyes, and enjoy the breathtaking 360 degree view of Jerusalem from the veranda surrounding the synagogue’s dome. This synagogue is located at the heart of the Jewish Quarter, and it is one of the most beautiful and impressive synagogues in Jerusalem and perhaps in the entire country. As far as I know an aliyah (“calling up”) to the Torah ceremony for a Bar Mitzvah, as well as conferences and other ceremonies can be held in the Hurva Synagogue. A visit to this Synagogue is a moving experience and a piece of history await those who visit the Hurva Synagogue.
Aryeh Beitz (2 years ago)
Amazing views from atop, beautiful subterranean archeology and the amazing reconstructed interior.
Rafael Peppe (2 years ago)
I love It so much It's a wonderful place ....
kabali kabali (2 years ago)
It's very pleasant place to be. The square gives you a well needed breathing space after a walk in the old City. It's very beautiful in the night.
y n (2 years ago)
Stunning architecture. If u are in the old city touring be sure to check this place out! They have mincha daily at 1:15 pm. There is a fee to go up to the top.
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