Husby-Ärlinghundra Church

Märsta, Sweden

The stone church of Husby-Ärlinghundra was built in the mid-12th century. The porch and sacristy were added later. The bell tower was erected in 1717 and restored in 1819 to the present appearance.

The sculpture of St. Michael, crucifix and mural paintings date from the Middle Ages. The Baroque-style pulpit was made in 1721.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1150
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ann-catrin Johansson (2 years ago)
Stämningsfull och på något sätt familjärt.
Fia Ängehov (2 years ago)
Grogruppen är nog det bästa vi har i kommunen!
Mattias Lundén (2 years ago)
Nice church, not too big not too small. Lagom
Karin Rudäng (3 years ago)
Kyrkogården behöver vårdas bättre.
ekilla300 blogger (3 years ago)
Ytterligt besviken, för många rasister. Jag och min invandrarfamilj skulle begrava våran gelb, och blev attackerad av någon syrian som sommarjobbade där med en afghan. De köpte sedan kyrkan för en krona och vi var tvungna att gå. Jag är besviken över detta. Nedan är bilder på mig och min flickvän, och vi är väldigt förbannade på hur vi blev behandlade. :(
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