Beginning in 982 the Sargans region was part of the lands of the Counts of Bregenz. In 1160, the male line of the Counts of Bregenz died out. Count palatine Hugo of Türbingen inherited most of their lands, through his wife Elisabeth. His son, Hugo, inherited the Bregenz lands around Lake Constance, including Sargans. This Hugo, who adopted the name Montfort und Werdenberg built or expanded Sargans Castle before his death in 1228. Excavations around the oldest part of the castle show that there was an earlier fort or castle, but nothing is known about that building. Hugo built the large bergfried, expanded the walls to the west and may have built a palas on that side of the castle.

In the mid-13th century the Montfort und Werdenberg lands were divided between Hugo of Werdenberg-Heiligenberg and his brother Hartmann of Werdenberg-Sargans. Hartmann took up residence in the castle and probably expanded the palas. The castle was first mentioned in 1282. Over the following century the wealth and lands of the Counts of Werdenberg-Sargans were divided over and over again between descendants. By the last 14th century, Count Johann I ruled over a small and poor county under the Habsburgs. In the Battle of Näfels in 1388, the count commanded a wing of the Austrian army that was supposed to cross the Kerenzerberg Pass. However, when he saw the threatened destruction of the main Austrian army, he fled back over the pass. The cost of the war, as well as other expenses forced Johann I to sell the castle and village to Leopold of Austria.

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Founded: 1282
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Johnny LY (3 months ago)
Good view
AnGeLo BeAu (3 months ago)
Nice little Castle in Sagans but unfortunately it was locked so couldn't climb up. The view from there is amazing
Lukas Timko (13 months ago)
Very nice very old castle. Castle is visible from the highway, therefore it is asking for a visit. It is easy accessible from Sargans city after you park your car below. You can also get close to the castle by car. There is a restaurant in the castle yard. Views are beautiful and you will be amazed by the views. If you see this castle from highway you can make the turn and spent there one or two hours and enjoy coffee in castle with nice views.
Latafat Afandiyeva (14 months ago)
Worth to visit the restaurant and the musem. Otherwise, nothing special to spend too much time there, except the view!
Amy Challenger (14 months ago)
Beautiful castle, outstanding views, easily accessible. The restaurant was my favorite part— indoors section just gorgeous with restored interior, decorative woodwork, paintings, peonies and orchids, incredible windows, pretty place settings, little eating alcoves, and lovely food at reasonable (Swiss) prices especially considering the atmosphere. Also the outdoor eating area beautiful though I visited on a rainy day. Views breathtaking. The museum had no English translations and involved 6 flights of pretty dangerous stairs for my elderly parents. We wanted to learn more, but didn’t have time to translate everything. The staff was especially friendly and welcoming and the whole setting was dreamy.
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