The ruins of Illens castle stand on a rock wall above a loop of the Saane river. The castle stands on the opposite side of the river from the fortified town of Arconciel. The two castles secured both sides of a crossing (either a ford or a bridge) over the river. The castle is first mentioned between 1150 and 1276.

In 1366, the notoriously violent Count Peter of Aarberg moved into the castle and remained there for a short while. The chamberlain of Charles the Bold, Guillaume de la Baume, expanded the castle and when he left in 1470, it was an elegant and comfortable palace. During the conflicts leading up to the Burgundian Wars, Fribourg and Bernese troops stormed and damaged the building on 3 January 1475.

In 1900, it was partly repaired and expanded and served a community of Trappist monks.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Claude Dupasquier (14 months ago)
Site très beau chargé d'histoires
Jean-François Charrière (14 months ago)
Lieu d'histoire extraordinaire
A. Gadient (19 months ago)
Das Schloss d'Illens, welches in einer lieblichen Umgebung liegt, ist leider nur als Ruine vorhanden. Verschiedene Details, etwa ein abbröckelndes Relief über dem Eingang, oder ein zierhaft gestaltetes Mauerstück lassen den früheren Charme des Gebäudes erahnen. Ob ein originaler Wiederaufbau, der sehr teuer wäre, gelingt, wird die Zukunft weisen.
DANIEL BONGARD (2 years ago)
Magnifique endroit historique du canton de Fribourg, district de la Sarine. En cours de rénovation. L'accès pour les personnes à mobilité réduite n'y est pas encore.
Didier Pittet (3 years ago)
Belle ruine. Une association est en train de restaurer les lieux.
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