A document from 1177 from the Abbey of Hauterive mentions the Romont as a wooded hill. In 1239, Anselme (or Nantelme) sold the rights to Romont hill to Peter II of Savoy. At that time, Romont was part of the territory of the Bishop of Lausanne. In 1240, Peter II sent a castellan to Romont to build a castle and found a village. The main castle (Grand Donjon), with a typical Savoy square floor plan, was completed before 1260. The original castle partially collapsed in 1579 and was rebuilt by Fribourg in 1591. Another castle with a round tower, formerly known as the Petit Donjon, but now known as Boyer-tower was built around 1250-1260, most likely by Peter II.

In the 16th century, the new governors from Fribourg built a further wing - now home to the Museum’s collection of reverse painting on glass. The entrance gate to the courtyard and the well also date from that period. The huge wooden draw-wheel for the well (18th century), the parapet walkway, and some lovely old trees lend the courtyard a particular cachet.

The interior of the old castle is equally remarkable: solid sandstone walls and an imposing timber roof-framework stand in interesting contrast to the metal structures of the new orangery, passerelle and stairwell added in 2006 when remodelling the Museum.

Romont Castle provides a perfect setting for the Vitromusée and Vitrocentre. The castle stands at the top of a picturesque hill at an altitude of 780m. Together with the medieval church and houses surrounded by the old town walls, it shapes the distinctive silhouette of the small town of Romont. The square in front of the castle opens onto a magnificent panorama of the Alps, with the majestic Mont Blanc visible to the right on a clear day.

The keep and the main part of the castle - which today houses the Museum’s stained-glass collection -  were built in the 13th century under Pierre II of Savoy.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aurélie Andrey (16 months ago)
Beau musée avec expo temporaires, jeu pour les enfants durant la visite, coin à langer et café.
Christopher (2 years ago)
Un très jolie musée, beaucoup de choses à voir, bien organisées et très instructifs. Il y a de très belles œuvres qui sont très ancienne tout comme d’autres très récentes. J’ai aussi beaucoup aimé l’exposition sur les peintures et notamment certaines peintures qui ont un effet 3D captivant.
ATHITHI RAMAN (2 years ago)
Fun place with a serene courtyard..Must Visit!
GNF Browning (2 years ago)
Interesting exhibition
John Wilkinson (4 years ago)
Interesting afternoon but could be better presented for Tourists
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Narikala Castle

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.