A document from 1177 from the Abbey of Hauterive mentions the Romont as a wooded hill. In 1239, Anselme (or Nantelme) sold the rights to Romont hill to Peter II of Savoy. At that time, Romont was part of the territory of the Bishop of Lausanne. In 1240, Peter II sent a castellan to Romont to build a castle and found a village. The main castle (Grand Donjon), with a typical Savoy square floor plan, was completed before 1260. The original castle partially collapsed in 1579 and was rebuilt by Fribourg in 1591. Another castle with a round tower, formerly known as the Petit Donjon, but now known as Boyer-tower was built around 1250-1260, most likely by Peter II.

In the 16th century, the new governors from Fribourg built a further wing - now home to the Museum’s collection of reverse painting on glass. The entrance gate to the courtyard and the well also date from that period. The huge wooden draw-wheel for the well (18th century), the parapet walkway, and some lovely old trees lend the courtyard a particular cachet.

The interior of the old castle is equally remarkable: solid sandstone walls and an imposing timber roof-framework stand in interesting contrast to the metal structures of the new orangery, passerelle and stairwell added in 2006 when remodelling the Museum.

Romont Castle provides a perfect setting for the Vitromusée and Vitrocentre. The castle stands at the top of a picturesque hill at an altitude of 780m. Together with the medieval church and houses surrounded by the old town walls, it shapes the distinctive silhouette of the small town of Romont. The square in front of the castle opens onto a magnificent panorama of the Alps, with the majestic Mont Blanc visible to the right on a clear day.

The keep and the main part of the castle - which today houses the Museum’s stained-glass collection -  were built in the 13th century under Pierre II of Savoy.

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Founded: 1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aurélie Andrey (3 months ago)
Beau musée avec expo temporaires, jeu pour les enfants durant la visite, coin à langer et café.
Christopher (8 months ago)
Un très jolie musée, beaucoup de choses à voir, bien organisées et très instructifs. Il y a de très belles œuvres qui sont très ancienne tout comme d’autres très récentes. J’ai aussi beaucoup aimé l’exposition sur les peintures et notamment certaines peintures qui ont un effet 3D captivant.
ATHITHI RAMAN (9 months ago)
Fun place with a serene courtyard..Must Visit!
GNF Browning (14 months ago)
Interesting exhibition
John Wilkinson (3 years ago)
Interesting afternoon but could be better presented for Tourists
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