Convento de San Esteban

Salamanca, Spain

Convento de San Esteban is a Dominican monastery situated in the Plaza del Concilio de Trento. The Dominicans settled in Salamanca in about 1255, but their original monastery was demolished to construct the parish church of St. Stephen in 1524, at the initiative of Cardinal Juan Álvarez de Toledo. Construction took until 1610.

Although the church is considered to be an excellent example of the Plateresque style, the long period of construction explains the mixture of styles ranging from Gothic to the late Baroque, the latter not so noticeable in the architecture but very apparent in the reredos of the main altar by José de Churriguera. According to tradition, Christopher Columbus stayed in this monastery (actually in the earlier building it replaced) when he came to Salamanca to defend his idea of reaching the Indies by sailing west, against the geographers of the University. During the Counter Reformation it was an important center where for the Dominicans who founded the School of Salamanca, headed by Francisco de Vitoria.

The facade comprises the front of the church and the adjacent monastery portico. The front the church is one of the finest examples of the Plateresque style.

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Details

Founded: 1524-1610
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Isabella Dicaprio (Isabella) (3 years ago)
It's probably one of my favorite sites in Salamanca. Beautiful historical building. It's preservation is outstanding. The gardens and the architecture around the convent make you go back in time. Easy access, not to far away from the Mayor square.
Richard Westerhout (4 years ago)
Beautiful building but the hole city is stunning !
Julia Canny (4 years ago)
Absolutely beautiful. So much history shared
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