Roman Bridge of Salamanca

Salamanca, Spain

The Roman bridge of Salamanca crosses the Tormes River. Actually it is a construction of two separated bridges by a central fortification: the old bridge which extends along the portion near the city and it is of Roman origin, and the new bridge. Of the twenty-six arches, only the first fifteen date from Roman times. The bridge has been restored on numerous occasions and has survived several attempts demolition. Many of the restorations have been poorly documented, leaving for the study of archaeologists a great part of the work of determination, dating and explanation of the construction techniques of the ancient. The date of the construction of the bridge not is precisely known, but is among the mandates of the Emperors Augustus (27 BC-14 AD) and Vespasian (69-79), making it a bimillennium architectural monument. 

The bridge is presented in the 21st century as a result of several restorations. One of the disasters that most affected it was the Flood of San Policarpo (January 26's night) of year 1626. From the construction of a third bridge for road traffic it remains a unique way of pedestrian and walking uses.

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Founded: 0-100 AD
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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Akshaya Raj (49 days ago)
Fun spot. We found a pond near by which was a great picnic/ resting point for us
Whemy (53 days ago)
Beautiful, relaxing, water smell, well conservation. It's just perfect and magic for couples
BSSC (2 months ago)
Went across it on a hot summer night. You can feel the centuries sleeping between your feet and the river.
Gerda Sonck (2 months ago)
Loved it. Just loved the quiet angle, away from the city centre yet near. Nice place to find a parking space away from the centre and yet very close to walk to the centre.
Youssef Semkala (Youssef Semkala) (12 months ago)
Worth visit place
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