Numantia was an ancient Celtiberian settlement. It was an Iron Age hill fort, which controlled a crossing of the river Duero.

Numantia is famous for its role in the Celtiberian Wars. In the year 153 BC Numantia experienced its first serious conflict with Rome. After 20 years of hostilities, in the year 133 BC the Roman Senate gave Scipio Aemilianus Africanus the task of destroying Numantia. He laid siege to the city, erecting a nine kilometre fence supported by towers, moats, impaling rods and so on. After 13 months of siege, the Numantians decided to burn the city and die free rather than live and be slaves.

After the destruction, there are remains of occupation in the 1st century BC, with a regular street plan but without great public buildings. Its decay starts in the 3rd century, but with Roman remains still from the 4th century. Later remains from the 6th century hint of a Visigoth occupation.

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Founded: 6th century BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

alaitz martinez (3 years ago)
Ok
Jesús García (4 years ago)
I highly recommend a guided tour to understand the ruins.
Roberto Martin (4 years ago)
Must visit. Piece of history. Still discovering more things as the years pass by.
Ruben S (4 years ago)
Very good guided tour, in spanish though...
Jeroen Mourik (5 years ago)
The amazing history of this Iberean Celtic town resisting the Roman occupation is what makes this historic site very special. Unfortunately the English audio guided tour is not that great, but the reconstruction of both a Roman and a Celtic house, made this visit extra special.
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