Soria Cathedral

Soria, Spain

Soria pro-Cathedral was built in the 12th century on the site of an old Augustine monastery, and was subsequently rebuilt in the 16th century in Renaissance style under the patronage of Bishop Acosta. The church has an open plan with three naves of equal heights, covered by vaults with star-shaped skylights. It has quite austere décor, both inside and out, except the south doorway, which is in Plateresque style, with a round arch with archivolts and a high frieze. It still conserves its 12th century Romanesque cloister.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.spainisculture.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Miguel Angel Sotillos (20 months ago)
Preciosa, merece la pena visitar el patio y solo cuesta 2 euros
Jose Manuel Calle (20 months ago)
Muy chula me gusto muncho el organo que lo estaban tocando , la unica pega muy oscura
Miguel Garcia (20 months ago)
Un gran monumento de Soria, aunque la verdad, parece un poco descuidado desde fuera, sobre todo el entorno.
Javier C. S. (22 months ago)
Por fuera es preciosa.desmerece en la parte trasera que hay una grúa y están de obras. El.acceso estaba cerrado, pero tampoco había ayer muchos turistas en Soria (creo que solamente nosotros)
Colin Aldrich (2 years ago)
Wonderful beyond doubt
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