Calatañazor Castle

Calatañazor, Spain

According to the legends, Al-Mansur (legendary Moorish leader) was defeated near Calatañazor Castle in a bloody battle against Christian troops in 1002. The fortress originally had two quadrangular towers on the corners and a keep. Later on, circular towers were added to the southern wall and semi-circular ones next to the main entrance. The current  appearance dates mainly from the 14th century.

The castle is part of the walled village of Calatañazor but separated from it by a dry moat that was cut out of the rock. On the castle's irregular enclosure there are ruins of several towers and the keep, which is situated next to the entrance over the moat.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Charlotte Harvey (15 months ago)
Such a cool place to watch the sun go down. You can climb up the tower and enjoy the view. The patch of grass looks about like the UK.
Martin Alcubierre (16 months ago)
High
Jose Vazquez (3 years ago)
Castle ruins in a very small turistic place. Nice typical houses to photograph and nice view from the castle over the valley. Place famous for a battle between muslims and cristians during the reconquest in the middle ages, where "Almanzor" lost the site and had to retreat south.
Jaime GT (3 years ago)
Well preserved medieval village with good examples of traditional architecture.
José Luis Briz Velasco (3 years ago)
Beautiful medieval village, worth visiting
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