Calatañazor Castle

Calatañazor, Spain

According to the legends, Al-Mansur (legendary Moorish leader) was defeated near Calatañazor Castle in a bloody battle against Christian troops in 1002. The fortress originally had two quadrangular towers on the corners and a keep. Later on, circular towers were added to the southern wall and semi-circular ones next to the main entrance. The current  appearance dates mainly from the 14th century.

The castle is part of the walled village of Calatañazor but separated from it by a dry moat that was cut out of the rock. On the castle's irregular enclosure there are ruins of several towers and the keep, which is situated next to the entrance over the moat.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ana Carolina Pellicer (14 months ago)
Beautiful village, good food and AMAZING views!
Guido Storms (16 months ago)
Beautiful ancient city that is very well preserved. A must see when passing through or if you are staying in the area.
John De Luca (17 months ago)
Awesome, historical and traditional place. Fully recommended to stop by of you're in the region.
Susan Firth (2 years ago)
Very interesting medieval village. Park at the bottom of the hill and walk up the cobbled street.
Charlotte Harvey (2 years ago)
Such a cool place to watch the sun go down. You can climb up the tower and enjoy the view. The patch of grass looks about like the UK.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.