Monastery of San Juan de Duero

Soria, Spain

Monastery of San Juan de Duero, built in the Romanesque style, consists of a single nave with a wooden roof, semicircular apse, and a pointed barrel vault. From the 12th century it belonged to the Knights Hospitaller of Jerusalem, until it was abandoned in the 18th century. The 12th century church and the 13th cloister, with Gothic and Mudéjar elements, are still standing.The arcades combine the various architectural styles current in Spain at the time: late Romanesque, early Gothic, and especially, Islamic tracery. These arches are criss-crossed to achieve a beautiful visual effect. Inside the church there is a display of items from Jewish, Islamic and Christian cultures.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Barbara Kuki Magrini (9 months ago)
Nice walk in the woods along the Duero to reach a marvellous mistic place.
Augusto Lopata (10 months ago)
AMAZING
Martin Ochoa (11 months ago)
Must visit site while visiting Soria
Alvaro RT (2 years ago)
Precioso claustro románico, además de curioso. Sus columnas y arcos forman una armónica serie. También se puede visitar la pequeña iglesia adosada que formaba parte del antiguo monasterio. El entorno está muy bien para pasear.
Joanna Mendoza (2 years ago)
Not a lot to see, but it is interesting, quick and inexpensive (1E each). Covid protocols are in place, including limited capacity to 10 person's at a time, hand sanitizer use before entry and masks required at all times.
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