Castrojeriz Castle

Castrojeriz, Spain

Castrojeriz village is considered one of the landmarks of historic interest in the Camino de Santiago. Its rich history may take up consideration as castro Visigoth, or perhaps, also, Roman fort, (they say was founded by Julius Caesar) in whose castle was developed important battles between Christians and Moors.

The first mention of this castle dates from the 9th century during the skirmishes with the Muslim forces. There are three clearly differentiated sections: the Roman part which is today reduced to an almost hidden square tower; the Visigoth part comprising the extension to the castle with different masonry work from in the Roman part; and the medieval part.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ken Tischler (15 months ago)
Cool place to visit although a bit of a trek to get up there. Be sure to bring some water as there is none available until you get back to Castrojeriz. The easiest way to get up here is to take the road behind the big church on the west end of town. Steep climb but they have rest benches in the way up.
Andreas Kirkby (2 years ago)
Beautiful ruin, and fantastic view. You really understand why they placed the castle there on the top.
John Laidler (2 years ago)
I've only given it four stars because they really should create a proper footpath from the village up to the castle. There is a path but it is poorly marked and not very safe in places. Adding English to the description boards around the site would also be helpful.
Ernst Verbeek (2 years ago)
Very well restaurated ruins. Worth a visit if you are up for the climb.
Viktor Kaposi (4 years ago)
Great views and free entrance.
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