Palencia Cathedral

Palencia, Spain

Palencia Cathedral was built from 1172 to 1504 stands over a low vaulted Visigothic crypt (the Crypt of San Antolín). It is a large Gothic building, popularly dubbed as 'The unknown beauty' because not as well known as other Spanish cathedrals, though, it is a valuable building which has in its interior a large number of works of art of great value.

Its more than 130 metres long, 42 metres high and 50 metres wide at the centre, making it one of the largest cathedrals in Spain and Europe.

Its exterior solid, simple and austere does not reflect the grandeur of its interior, with more than twenty chapels of great artistic and historical interest. The most recognizable on the outside, is the tower, slim but a little rough, considering your Gothic style. Recent studies and excavations show that it was a military tower, and after serving this function were added to their pinnacles and cattail as the sole decoration.

The Cathedral's museum contains a number of important works of art, including a retablo of twelve panels by Juan de Flandes, court painter to Queen Isabella I of Castile and El Greco's St. Sebastian' (1576–79).

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Founded: 1172
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

claro caballero (2 years ago)
Magnífica catedral gótica la bella desconocida. Uno de los pocos ejemplos del gótico francés en España junto a la catedral de León. Su belleza destaca en el interior ya que la trama urbana de Palencia no permite apreciar el edificio en conjunto. Bellísimo claustro. Es sin duda el edificio más destacable de la ciudad.
Dioni Mena (2 years ago)
Un lugar único. Una de las tres Catedrales más grandes de España. Tres templos en uno. Lugar donde se nombraron los primeros Príncipes de Asturias. Un templo mágico. En fin, la visita es obligada si se quiere saber de auténticas Catedrales.
Peter Cooper (2 years ago)
A must see if you are in Palencia. Spectacular from the outside, and even more impressive inside. Built on a Visigothic place of worship (which can still be seen in the crypt below), it stands as a visual representation of the development in Gothic architecture over time. Highly recommended to visit with a guide.
odnanrefAI (3 years ago)
One of the greatest and more beautiful cathedrals in Spain. Also, if you want to visit something colossal off the beaten road, this is your city, this is the cathedral
Manuel Peña (4 years ago)
Unbeliebable. One of the most impressive Cathedrals in Spain.
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Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

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