Palencia Cathedral

Palencia, Spain

Palencia Cathedral was built from 1172 to 1504 stands over a low vaulted Visigothic crypt (the Crypt of San Antolín). It is a large Gothic building, popularly dubbed as 'The unknown beauty' because not as well known as other Spanish cathedrals, though, it is a valuable building which has in its interior a large number of works of art of great value.

Its more than 130 metres long, 42 metres high and 50 metres wide at the centre, making it one of the largest cathedrals in Spain and Europe.

Its exterior solid, simple and austere does not reflect the grandeur of its interior, with more than twenty chapels of great artistic and historical interest. The most recognizable on the outside, is the tower, slim but a little rough, considering your Gothic style. Recent studies and excavations show that it was a military tower, and after serving this function were added to their pinnacles and cattail as the sole decoration.

The Cathedral's museum contains a number of important works of art, including a retablo of twelve panels by Juan de Flandes, court painter to Queen Isabella I of Castile and El Greco's St. Sebastian' (1576–79).

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Details

Founded: 1172
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

claro caballero (3 months ago)
Magnífica catedral gótica la bella desconocida. Uno de los pocos ejemplos del gótico francés en España junto a la catedral de León. Su belleza destaca en el interior ya que la trama urbana de Palencia no permite apreciar el edificio en conjunto. Bellísimo claustro. Es sin duda el edificio más destacable de la ciudad.
Dioni Mena (3 months ago)
Un lugar único. Una de las tres Catedrales más grandes de España. Tres templos en uno. Lugar donde se nombraron los primeros Príncipes de Asturias. Un templo mágico. En fin, la visita es obligada si se quiere saber de auténticas Catedrales.
Peter Cooper (3 months ago)
A must see if you are in Palencia. Spectacular from the outside, and even more impressive inside. Built on a Visigothic place of worship (which can still be seen in the crypt below), it stands as a visual representation of the development in Gothic architecture over time. Highly recommended to visit with a guide.
odnanrefAI (11 months ago)
One of the greatest and more beautiful cathedrals in Spain. Also, if you want to visit something colossal off the beaten road, this is your city, this is the cathedral
Manuel Peña (2 years ago)
Unbeliebable. One of the most impressive Cathedrals in Spain.
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