Burgos Museum

Burgos, Spain

Burgos Museum offers the chance for visitors to explore the historical and cultural evolution of this province in the Castile-León region. It has various different sections such as prehistory and archaeology, located in the Casa de Miranda, a Renaissance palace. Here you can see objects from Atapuerca and Ojo Guareña, and also from the Iron Age necropolis of Miraveche, Ubierna and Villanueva de Teba, along with Roman artefacts from the city of Clunia.

The building Casa de Angulo is home to the Fine Arts section, which has a major collection of exhibits ranging from the Mozarabic period through to the present day, with items such as the Romanesque frontal from the church of Santo Domingo de Silos and the tomb of Juan de Padilla by Gil de Siloé, along with 15th- and 16th-century paintings and works of art from the Baroque period.

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Address

Calle Calera 25, Burgos, Spain
See all sites in Burgos

Details

Founded: 1846
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Corey Baker (2 years ago)
I really like this museum, it is better than many museums you find in cities more than twice the size. Really informative and interesting if you enjoy history of humans and how we've evolved. I also enjoyed how interactive this museum is, lots to read, play with, etc. The quality of the exhibit and pieces are top notch. I've been twice here and I will go again.
Shivani Rajwade (3 years ago)
Superb place! Definitely worth visiting. Some more content in English can be more useful
Pam Owens (3 years ago)
Very good museum lots of information on each display. Air cooled and places to sit and digest information. Great as it is free for teacher's with identification. Not many places where teachers get recognised. Well worth the visit.
Edward Schweitzer (3 years ago)
Incredibly well putt together muaeum.
Lisa G. (4 years ago)
I visited the museum during my pilgrimage 2016 and I highly recommend it to everyone. Lots of information, amazing installations and a certain feeling of wonder is what you can expect. Evolution of body and mind is somehow a biological mystery. Lots of it explained, but still mystery. :)
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