Burgos Museum

Burgos, Spain

Burgos Museum offers the chance for visitors to explore the historical and cultural evolution of this province in the Castile-León region. It has various different sections such as prehistory and archaeology, located in the Casa de Miranda, a Renaissance palace. Here you can see objects from Atapuerca and Ojo Guareña, and also from the Iron Age necropolis of Miraveche, Ubierna and Villanueva de Teba, along with Roman artefacts from the city of Clunia.

The building Casa de Angulo is home to the Fine Arts section, which has a major collection of exhibits ranging from the Mozarabic period through to the present day, with items such as the Romanesque frontal from the church of Santo Domingo de Silos and the tomb of Juan de Padilla by Gil de Siloé, along with 15th- and 16th-century paintings and works of art from the Baroque period.

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Address

Calle Calera 25, Burgos, Spain
See all sites in Burgos

Details

Founded: 1846
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gianmarco Giunti (3 months ago)
I was expecting a little bit more extensive experience. More engagement, more storytelling.
Alexa F (4 months ago)
An interesting walk through history. Complying with all regulations regarding covid safety measures.
Helen Rickard (10 months ago)
Very interesting and enjoyable although a section on the disputes and disagreements over the timeline would be a really helpful addition.
Berglind Margo Þorvaldsdóttir Tryggvason (11 months ago)
Great museum. Very interesting and well built. We loved it. One comment I have is that animal species are sometimes mentioned next to bome but it would be great to have their pictures there as well (for those of us who do not know them ;) ). Almost everything is translated to English which is a big plus.
Ana Karina Sánchez Gamboa (2 years ago)
The place turns more interesting as you go farther in. One of its greatest accomplishments in my opinion is how a very scientific subject that could be unfriendly for the general public is made so interesting and engaging. There’s a nice balance between the extremely minimal architecture the gorgeous lighting and the displays, making it easier to go through all the information without feeling overwhelmed by it. They have many interactive displays that allow you to have a full learning experience. Nevertheless, it is necessary to take the time to read and interact with said displays to be able to understand and enjoy the experience, it takes a long time to do the full circuit and though you most likely won’t be bored, you might get tired luckily, they have places for you to sit and rest a library with vending machines and you can even go outside and return later that same day with the same ticket (at least that was my experience). They also have temporary exhibitions.
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Kirkjubøargarður

Kirkjubøargarður ('Yard of Kirkjubøur', also known as King"s Farm) is one of the oldest still inhabited wooden houses of the world. The farm itself has always been the largest in the Faroe Islands. The old farmhouse dates back to the 11th century. It was the episcopal residence and seminary of the Diocese of the Faroe Islands, from about 1100. Sverre I of Norway (1151–1202), grew up here and went to the priest school. The legend says, that the wood for the block houses came as driftwood from Norway and was accurately bundled and numbered, just for being set up. Note, that there is no forest in the Faroes and wood is a very valuable material. Many such wood legends are thus to be found in Faroese history.

The oldest part is a so-called roykstova (reek parlour, or smoke room). Perhaps it was moved one day, because it does not fit to its foundation. Another ancient room is the loftstovan (loft room). It is supposed that Bishop Erlendur wrote the 'Sheep Letter' here in 1298. This is the earliest document of the Faroes we know today. It is the statute concerning sheep breeding on the Faroes. Today the room is the farm"s library. The stórastovan (large room) is from a much later date, being built in 1772.

Though the farmhouse is a museum, the 17th generation of the Patursson Family, which has occupied it since 1550, is still living here. Shortly after the Reformation in the Faroe Islands in 1538, all the real estate of the Catholic Church was seized by the King of Denmark. This was about half of the land in the Faroes, and since then called King"s Land (kongsjørð). The largest piece of King"s Land was the farm in Kirkjubøur due to the above-mentioned Episcopal residence. This land is today owned by the Faroese government, and the Paturssons are tenants from generation to generation. It is always the oldest son, who becomes King"s Farmer, and in contrast to the privately owned land, the King"s Land is never divided between the sons.

The farm holds sheep, cattle and some horses. It is possible to get a coffee here and buy fresh mutton and beef directly from the farmer. In the winter season there is also hare hunting for the locals. Groups can rent the roykstovan for festivities and will be served original Faroese cuisine.

Other famous buildings directly by the farmhouse are the Magnus Cathedral and the Saint Olav"s Church, which also date back to the mediaeval period. All three together represent the Faroe Island"s most interesting historical site.