Burgos Museum

Burgos, Spain

Burgos Museum offers the chance for visitors to explore the historical and cultural evolution of this province in the Castile-León region. It has various different sections such as prehistory and archaeology, located in the Casa de Miranda, a Renaissance palace. Here you can see objects from Atapuerca and Ojo Guareña, and also from the Iron Age necropolis of Miraveche, Ubierna and Villanueva de Teba, along with Roman artefacts from the city of Clunia.

The building Casa de Angulo is home to the Fine Arts section, which has a major collection of exhibits ranging from the Mozarabic period through to the present day, with items such as the Romanesque frontal from the church of Santo Domingo de Silos and the tomb of Juan de Padilla by Gil de Siloé, along with 15th- and 16th-century paintings and works of art from the Baroque period.

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Address

Calle Calera 25, Burgos, Spain
See all sites in Burgos

Details

Founded: 1846
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gianmarco Giunti (17 months ago)
I was expecting a little bit more extensive experience. More engagement, more storytelling.
Alexa F (18 months ago)
An interesting walk through history. Complying with all regulations regarding covid safety measures.
Helen Rickard (2 years ago)
Very interesting and enjoyable although a section on the disputes and disagreements over the timeline would be a really helpful addition.
Berglind Margo Þorvaldsdóttir Tryggvason (2 years ago)
Great museum. Very interesting and well built. We loved it. One comment I have is that animal species are sometimes mentioned next to bome but it would be great to have their pictures there as well (for those of us who do not know them ;) ). Almost everything is translated to English which is a big plus.
Ana Karina Sánchez Gamboa (3 years ago)
The place turns more interesting as you go farther in. One of its greatest accomplishments in my opinion is how a very scientific subject that could be unfriendly for the general public is made so interesting and engaging. There’s a nice balance between the extremely minimal architecture the gorgeous lighting and the displays, making it easier to go through all the information without feeling overwhelmed by it. They have many interactive displays that allow you to have a full learning experience. Nevertheless, it is necessary to take the time to read and interact with said displays to be able to understand and enjoy the experience, it takes a long time to do the full circuit and though you most likely won’t be bored, you might get tired luckily, they have places for you to sit and rest a library with vending machines and you can even go outside and return later that same day with the same ticket (at least that was my experience). They also have temporary exhibitions.
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