Burgos Cathedral

Burgos, Spain

The Burgos Cathedral construction began in 1221 and was completed in 1567. It is a comprehensive example of the evolution of Gothic style, with the entire history of Gothic art exhibited in its superb architecture and unique collection of art, including paintings, choir stalls, reredos, tombs, and stained-glass windows.

The plan of the Cathedral is based on a Latin Cross of harmonious proportions of 84 by 59 metres. The three-story elevation, the vaulting, and the tracery of the windows are closely related to contemporary models of the north of France. The portals of the transept may also be compared to the great sculpted ensembles of the French royal domain, while the enamelled, brass tomb of Bishop Mauricio resembles the so-called Limoges goldsmith work. Undertaken after the Cathedral, the two-storied cloister, which was completed towards 1280, still fits within the framework of the French high Gothic.

After a hiatus of nearly 200 years, work resumed on the Burgos Cathedral towards the middle of the 15th century and continued for more than 100 years. The work done during this time consisted of embellishments of great splendour, assuring the Cathedral’s continued world-renown status. Two architects, Juan de Vallejo and Juan de Castañeda, completed the prodigious cupola with its starred vaulting in 1567, the Burgos Cathedral unified one of the greatest known concentrations of late Gothic masterpieces: the Puerta de la Pellejería (1516) of Francisco de Colonia, the ornamental grill and choir stalls, the grill of the chapel of the Presentation (1519), the retable of Gil de Siloe in the Constable's chapel, the retable of Gil de Siloe and Diego de la Cruz in Saint Anne's chapel, the staircase of Diego de Siloe in the north transept arm (1519), the tombs of Bishop Alonso de Cartagena, Bishop Alonso Luis Osorio de Acuña, the Abbot Juan Ortega de Velasco, the Constable Pedro Hernández de Velasco and, his wife Doña Mencía de Mendoza, etc.

Thereafter, the cathedral continued to be a monument favoured by the arts: the Renaissance retable of the Capilla Mayor by Rodrigo and Martin de la Haya, Domingo de Berriz, and Juan de Anchieta (1562-1580), the tomb of Enrique de Peralta y Cardenas in the chapel of Saint Mary, the chapel of Santa Tecla, and the 'trascoro' of the 18th century.

The cathedral was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO on October 31, 1984. It is the only Spanish cathedral that has this distinction independently.

 

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Founded: 1221
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mila Rivera (3 years ago)
Stunning! Maybe it's just because I'm not used to seeing this sort of thing in the United states, but I was in awe at how beautiful this place was! If you're in Burgos, visiting the cathedral is a no brainer!
Motorhome Quest (3 years ago)
It is an impressive cathedral made all the more inviting by free entry on a Tuesday afternoon from 5pm. Best to loosen your neck muscles as you will be doing a lot of looking up.
Steven Allan (3 years ago)
I have visited so many cathedrals while I have been in Spain but this one is a must see. You are able to get much closer than normal to the alter and other artifacts. Behind the main alter there are some exquisite carved displays. There is also the bonus of the museum of other paintings and other artifacts. This is a cathedral you should visit.
Isabella Dicaprio (Isabella) (3 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral in the middle of a big square surrounded by all sorts of restaurants and souvenir shops. Fantastic whine and of course the black sausage is a delicatessen in this area. Clean and friendly, Burgos is one of those cities you'll consider coming back.
Alexa F (3 years ago)
Absolutely stunning. Impressive architecture. This is one of the most beautiful cathedrals I’ve ever seen
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