Burgos Cathedral

Burgos, Spain

The Burgos Cathedral construction began in 1221 and was completed in 1567. It is a comprehensive example of the evolution of Gothic style, with the entire history of Gothic art exhibited in its superb architecture and unique collection of art, including paintings, choir stalls, reredos, tombs, and stained-glass windows.

The plan of the Cathedral is based on a Latin Cross of harmonious proportions of 84 by 59 metres. The three-story elevation, the vaulting, and the tracery of the windows are closely related to contemporary models of the north of France. The portals of the transept may also be compared to the great sculpted ensembles of the French royal domain, while the enamelled, brass tomb of Bishop Mauricio resembles the so-called Limoges goldsmith work. Undertaken after the Cathedral, the two-storied cloister, which was completed towards 1280, still fits within the framework of the French high Gothic.

After a hiatus of nearly 200 years, work resumed on the Burgos Cathedral towards the middle of the 15th century and continued for more than 100 years. The work done during this time consisted of embellishments of great splendour, assuring the Cathedral’s continued world-renown status. Two architects, Juan de Vallejo and Juan de Castañeda, completed the prodigious cupola with its starred vaulting in 1567, the Burgos Cathedral unified one of the greatest known concentrations of late Gothic masterpieces: the Puerta de la Pellejería (1516) of Francisco de Colonia, the ornamental grill and choir stalls, the grill of the chapel of the Presentation (1519), the retable of Gil de Siloe in the Constable's chapel, the retable of Gil de Siloe and Diego de la Cruz in Saint Anne's chapel, the staircase of Diego de Siloe in the north transept arm (1519), the tombs of Bishop Alonso de Cartagena, Bishop Alonso Luis Osorio de Acuña, the Abbot Juan Ortega de Velasco, the Constable Pedro Hernández de Velasco and, his wife Doña Mencía de Mendoza, etc.

Thereafter, the cathedral continued to be a monument favoured by the arts: the Renaissance retable of the Capilla Mayor by Rodrigo and Martin de la Haya, Domingo de Berriz, and Juan de Anchieta (1562-1580), the tomb of Enrique de Peralta y Cardenas in the chapel of Saint Mary, the chapel of Santa Tecla, and the 'trascoro' of the 18th century.

The cathedral was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO on October 31, 1984. It is the only Spanish cathedral that has this distinction independently.

 

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Founded: 1221
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ken Tischler (2 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral. Not as grandiose as some we seen in Italy but still impressive nonetheless. The audio guide is included with admission and is pretty good.
Herminio Dominguez (2 years ago)
AMAZING cathedral. The Gothic style is unique. You are able to visit every single chapel.
Daniel Urjan (2 years ago)
Catedral de Santa María de Burgos, popularly known as The Burgos Cathedral is the most remarkable building in Burgos and one of most beautiful Gothic Cathedral in Spain, which has been a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1984. Burgos Cathedral is an important point in the Way of Saint James’ pilgrims. Tourists can also visit the nearby Plaza Rey San Fernando and take a look at the tired pilgrim statue and the noteworthy Saint Mary arch which is opposite to the Cathedral and was one of the walls’ gates to enter the city in the medieval times. There are several cafes, restaurants, shops in this square.
Charles Ednie (2 years ago)
During our travels, we had the opportunity to take a tour of Burgos Cathedral. It was an awesome experience. It is so beautiful with so many chapels, it's difficult to comprehend the beauty and intricacies of such an expansive creation, who's production started almost 800 years ago. The tomb of El Cid and his wife is located in the Cathedral. Each corridor and each chapel were spectacular in the views of the artwork and architecture that they provided. This Cathedral is candy for the mind, heart and soul. If you are in the area near Burgos, I think you should make a point of visiting this grand, holy structural tribute to the Virgin Mary, the Blessed Mother of Jesus. I believe you will enjoy the experience. The Cathedral is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Steve Ryan (2 years ago)
Wow! This is one of the best Cathedrals we've ever visited. Don't miss it if you're in Burgos and don't just drive past Burgos make a point of stopping over for a visit. You won't be disappointed.
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