Arco de Santa María

Burgos, Spain

Arco de Santa María is one of the 12 medieval gates of Burgos had during the middle ages. It was rebuilt by Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor during the 16th century after the local rulers of the city supported him during the Revolt of the Comuneros. On the facade of the arch appear people of importance to the city of Burgos and Castile, such as Diego Rodríguez Porcelos, the founder of the city, Jueces de Castilla Laín Calvo and Nuño Rasura, El Cid, Fernán González and Charles V himself.

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Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sandri Beni Garci (7 months ago)
Burgos is diferent
Helena Sunny (2 years ago)
Among twelve medieval gates of Burgos, Arco de Santa Maria is most intricate and impressive. Rebuilt by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V in 16th century, the sculptures on its facade were dedicated to some important figures of the city who had given their supports to the Emperor. Arco de Santa Maria was added in the list of National Monument in 1943.
cerveza (2 years ago)
Entrance to the old town, built in the 16th century
Miroslav Janovic (2 years ago)
It's lovely place
Edd.g Day (2 years ago)
A nice gate, quite photogenic. Admire with some churros y chocolate on a chilly evening.
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