Cuéllar Castle

Cuéllar, Spain

Cuéllar Castle is conserved in good condition, and it has been built in different architectural styles between the 13th and 18th century. Much of the castle in the Gothic and Renaissance styles. The military building was extended and transformed in the 16th century, turning it into the palace of the Duke of Alburquerque. Among its historical owners, stands out Álvaro de Luna and Beltrán de la Cueva, as well as the successive Dukes of Alburquerque. 

The Dukes of Alburquerque lived in this castle for centuries until they moved to Madrid to be close to the court. Thereafter their use of the castle was as leisure and holidays palace, abandoning the building slowly. At the late 19th century the castle was almost completely abandoned, and was victim of robberies. In 1938 was a political prison was settled within the castle, and after was established also a sanatorium for prisoners affected by tuberculosis. It was used as prison till 1966.

In 1972, the Department of Fine Arts carried out an intensive restoration, and made it the home of a Vocational Education school, which continues to this day.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Patricia Martorell (9 months ago)
Amazing show at the castle, great for kids
J K (10 months ago)
Very well maintained and large walls with great visits during the day and theatre events on the weekend. Should well be a top place to visit in the area. As the Castle is an archive and school as well the place is clean and with lots of activities.
Robert Ward (2 years ago)
Not in the Lonely planet but given its size it should. Fantastic historic areas ,illuminated Castillo,centro/shopping,small Jewish quarter,and quaint Spanish houses,playas,and fantastic feel.Goodfor couple of days.
Dmitry Deev (2 years ago)
Fantastic, well maintained castle with amazing show. Really good actors , very entertaining perfomance. We had a great time even though it looked very long at the first glance. Nice view from the walls.
Dmitry Deev (2 years ago)
Great Castle with an awesome suprise. Theatrical perfomance that accompanies the tour is top class. Acting is very impressive even without any knowledge of Spanish we had a blast
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