Valladolid Cathedral

Valladolid, Spain

The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Holy Assumption in Valladolid was originally designed as the largest cathedral in Europe. Initially planned as the Cathedral for the capital city of Spain, ultimately, only 40-45% of the intended project was completed, due to lack of resources after the court moved towards Madrid, and the expenses caused by the difficult foundations of the church.

The structure has its origins in a late Gothic collegiate church, which begun in the late 15th century. The cathedral that was planned would have been immense. When construction started, Valladolid was the de facto capital of Spain, housing king Philip II and his court. However, due to strategic and geopolitical reasons, by the 1560s the capital was moved to Madrid and construction funds were largely cut. Thus the cathedral was not finished according to Herrera's design, and further modified during the 17th and 18th centuries, such as the addition to the top of the main façade, a work by Churriguera.

Its main façade is made up of two stretches of columns: the lower part, the work of Juan de Herrera, and the upper, that of Churriguera, which is characterised by its abundant decorative elements. The inside of the building is split up into three naves with side chapels between the butresses. The 15th century altarpiece is the work of Juan de Juni and depicts figures of saints. The Cathedral Museum is also to be found inside the church.

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Details

Founded: 1589
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Débora Vilasboas (19 months ago)
Nice place to take a picture andas have a coffee or a beer
David Knapp (19 months ago)
OK, some people will hate me but I thought this was a boring Cathedral. Sure, you get that Gothic architecture stretching-up-to-heaven feeling, but that is pretty common. And the Alter piece is well carved but it reminded me of the comics page in the Sunday newspaper; just blocks of single actions.
Tania Rodriguez Yanguela (19 months ago)
Amazing colonial cathedral in the heart of Valladolid. When visit the cathedral also walk around the Plaza and the streets nearby. The colonial houses are amazing
Bica Alexandru (20 months ago)
Nice place to visit , and also all around of it.
Gerard Fleming (21 months ago)
It was closed but looks great from the outside.
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