Hospital de Tavera

Toledo, Spain

The Hospital de Tavera is an important Building of Renaissance style in Toledo. It was built between 1541 and 1603 by order of the Cardinal Tavera. This hospital is dedicated to John the Baptist and also served as pantheon for its patron, Cardinal Tavera. Initially it began to be constructed under the supervision of Alonso de Covarrubias, being succeeded by other architects and finishing the work Bartolomé Bustamante.

Currently the building remains the property of the House of Medinaceli and inside it is the Museo Fundación Lerma, which houses part of the artistic collections of this lineage, as well as the Section of the Nobility of the National Historic Archive.

The appearance of the building is that of a Florencian Renaissance palace, except for the portal, that was constructed in the 18th century, between the years 1760 and 1762. It is a regular building with an Italian-style façade, with equidistant and rectangular windows on the lower floor and semicircular on the upper, being the opposite of the extreme. The ensemble is joined by two columned twinned courtyards, separated and joined together by a double arcade that crosses them towards the church.

In the museum there is a large archive of documents and numerous works of art of great value are preserved: paintings by El Greco, Ribera, Tintoretto, Luca Giordano , Titian, Snyders and Jacopo Bassano, among others. One of the few portraits painted by Zurbarán, and a copy of Tiziano's Equestrian Portrait of Charles V, painted by Sánchez Coello. Equally exceptional is the sculpture of the Resurrected Christ, by El Greco. In addition, it lodges in its dependencies the building of the old pharmacy of the hospital and the Section of the Nobility of the National Historic Archive.

References:

    Comments

    Your name



    Details

    Founded: 1541-1603
    Category:

    Rating

    4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Ariel Liebert (2 years ago)
    Not obligatory
    Michał Kaczmarek (2 years ago)
    The museum offers interesting guided tour, also in English. The archive room is a true gem!
    Atalia Aron (3 years ago)
    We walked all the way there to find out they were closed for 2 weeks. Very disappointing as I was so looking forward to visiting. Maybe I will be back in Toledo, but just sad there is no way to know if it is open or not unless you go all the way there.
    Carina van Vuuren (4 years ago)
    Amazing. Good value for money
    Patrick Nissens (5 years ago)
    Although they don't have as many visitors as the rest of Toledo (because they're less known), it's highly recommended.
    Powered by Google

    Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

    Historic Site of the week

    Roman Walls of Lugo

    Roman Walls of Lugo are an exceptional architectural, archaeological and constructive legacy of Roman engineering, dating from the 3rd and 4th centuries AD. The Walls are built of internal and external stone facings of slate with some granite, with a core filling of a conglomerate of slate slabs and worked stone pieces from Roman buildings, interlocked with lime mortar.

    Their total length of 2117 m in the shape of an oblong rectangle occupies an area of 1.68 ha. Their height varies between 8 and 10 m, with a width of 4.2 m, reaching 7 m in some specific points. The walls still contain 85 external towers, 10 gates (five of which are original and five that were opened in modern times), four staircases and two ramps providing access to the walkway along the top of the walls, one of which is internal and the other external. Each tower contained access stairs leading from the intervallum to the wall walk of town wall, of which a total of 21 have been discovered to date.

    The defences of Lugo are the most complete and best preserved example of Roman military architecture in the Western Roman Empire.

    Despite the renovation work carried out, the walls conserve their original layout and the construction features associated with their defensive purpose, with walls, battlements, towers, fortifications, both modern and original gates and stairways, and a moat.

    Since they were built, the walls have defined the layout and growth of the city, which was declared a Historical-Artistic Ensemble in 1973, forming a part of it and becoming an emblematic structure that can be freely accessed to walk along. The local inhabitants and visitors alike have used them as an area for enjoyment and as a part of urban life for centuries.

    The fortifications were added to UNESCO"s World Heritage List in late 2000 and are a popular tourist attraction.