Coracera castle was built by Álvaro de Luna in the 15th century, as a residence and hunting lodge. However, there are references to a previous construction, dating from the time of Alfonso VIII of Castile in the 12th and 13th centuries. The castle is in a good state, as a result of several restoration works.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sefo Efren (11 months ago)
Bien para ver sin problema como es un castillo por dentro. La visita se hace rápido ya que no hay mucho que ver solo buscar rincones con encanto y te transporten al pasado. Podría ser un gran proyecto si se le dedicara más tiempo parece que esta dejado de la mano.
Jorge Ucendo (12 months ago)
Visita muy completa y didáctica. Las proyecciones y los carteles dan información suficiente para no necesitar guía. Mejoraría las proyecciones en la torre del homenaje ya que no se visualizan del todo bien. Por lo demás una visita muy recomendable.
Jesús García (12 months ago)
Interesting place to go.
Stefan Andrei (2 years ago)
Beauriful pueblo with castle and church
Erica Haller (2 years ago)
The price to get in escapes my mind at the moment but honestly wasn't overly exciting. The shell of the castle invites you in and then once paid you are in a large courtyard with a large olive oil thing. The rooms to explore have floating modern not even attempted to look authentic laminated looking bright faux wood. The only reason k give it three stars is because the view from the top of the castle is breathtaking of the mountains and the staff seemed friendly. Honestly this is more of just a place for people to get married or have gatherings of sorts not really a touristy thing unless you want to sit and sample local wines.
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