Coracera castle was built by Álvaro de Luna in the 15th century, as a residence and hunting lodge. However, there are references to a previous construction, dating from the time of Alfonso VIII of Castile in the 12th and 13th centuries. The castle is in a good state, as a result of several restoration works.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jar Hen (2 years ago)
Interesting, rather small, good panoramas. Historical. Watch for open hours. Probably the best is that wasn't crowdy.
Graciela Alfano (2 years ago)
Worth visiting
Martin Ochoa (3 years ago)
Nice but very clearly has big reconstruction. Worth visiting on the way to pantano de san juan for a 4 eur ticket.
Sefo Efren (3 years ago)
Bien para ver sin problema como es un castillo por dentro. La visita se hace rápido ya que no hay mucho que ver solo buscar rincones con encanto y te transporten al pasado. Podría ser un gran proyecto si se le dedicara más tiempo parece que esta dejado de la mano.
Jorge Ucendo (3 years ago)
Visita muy completa y didáctica. Las proyecciones y los carteles dan información suficiente para no necesitar guía. Mejoraría las proyecciones en la torre del homenaje ya que no se visualizan del todo bien. Por lo demás una visita muy recomendable.
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