Coca Castle

Coca, Spain

Magnificent Coca Castle was built in the 15th century by Alonso de Fonseca, a mighty archbishop of Seville, during the reign of King Enrique IV of Castile. It's made up of two square baileys separated by a passageway. Both show polygonal towers at the corners. The double walls are 2.5 m thick and it's circled by a deep dry moat.

Coca castle is a mixture of western and Moorish military architecture, as can be seen from its decoration. It has a square ground plan, a moat and two walled enclosures, which gives it the air of impregnability for which it has been known over the centuries. The keep is located in the second area. It is made of brick and its walls are profusely decorated. The interior is very luxurious and lavish, and conserves its Mudejar decoration. Due to its great splendour, it was used more as a palace than as a fortress. It is one of the crowning works of the military Mudejar style.

The castle is owned by the Alva family and now serves as a training center for foresters. Their school is situated in the inner bailey.

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Address

Rotonda Castillo 2, Coca, Spain
See all sites in Coca

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.spain.info
www.castles.nl

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jean François (16 months ago)
Beautiful and no very big castle, nevertheless I decided not to visit its courtyards (out of time). John
Christian Gruber (16 months ago)
Largely unaccessible, the inside is a school for state workers though the exterior grounds within the walls is accessible. There's been a lot of repair to the exterior, so it is in reasonable good condition, though the authenticity of the architecture detail is questionable because of the extensive repair-which is clearly ongoing and not at all, shall I say, original. I do recommend it because it is a fun experience to roam around the interior wall.
Paul Boursalian (17 months ago)
Cutest castle ever. Small but high. The drive I'd awful.
Ann White (2 years ago)
Unfortunately the interior of the castle closes for four hours in the middle of the day but you're still free to roam at your own pace around the exterior. The moat and towers are very impressive with a Moorish look about them. One of the largest castles we saw. There's free parking nearby, along with a bull ring, a few shops and cafes, and a short section of the remains of the city walls. Definitely worth the detour.
Derek Lowdon (2 years ago)
One of the most famous Castles in Spain, built by Muslim Architect and workers in a Mujedar style ; fantastic brickwork. Closes 1.30-4.30 pm approx but open mornings and late afternoon until about 7pm. Unable to visit rooms on visit due to arriving in siesta period. Very beautiful to view.
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