Wambierzyce Basilica

Wambierzyce, Poland

Basilica of the Visitation was built between 1715 and 1723. The basilica was given the status of a basilica minor by Pope Pius XI in 1936. The present basilica is located on a hill, where in the twelfth-century, stood a wooden figure of Mary, the Mother of God. According to a chronicle from 1218, the blind Jan from Raszewo regained his sight there. After the event, many pilgrims began visiting the area. Shortly afterwards, an altar, together with candlesticks and a baptismal font, was placed by the statue under the tree. In 1263, a wooden church was built on the hill.

In 1512, Ludwik von Panwitz raised a greater church, constructed out of brick. However, the church was destroyed during the Thirty Years' War. Between 1695 and 1711, a new church was built, but quickly began to crumble and was deconstructed in 1714. Between 1715 and 1723, another church was built by Count Franciszek Antony von Goetzen, which stands to the present day.

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Details

Founded: 1715-1723
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Krzysztof T. K (11 months ago)
Big shrine at the gates of the Table mountains. Frequently visited both by pilgrims and other tourists. This probably would be the only reason to visit Wambierzyce.
Randall Stevens (2 years ago)
Very nice, lots of chambers, thou not as big as it would seem from the outside. Nice candle stand though
Ivan Bok (2 years ago)
Quiet place, blessed by Our Mother, but some "artwork" is not worth to see...
LUKASZ Lukasz Hulboj (2 years ago)
Spiritual experience
Iker michalsson (3 years ago)
Beautiful. Very friendly host, pani Regina, can show you around.
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