Wambierzyce Basilica

Wambierzyce, Poland

Basilica of the Visitation was built between 1715 and 1723. The basilica was given the status of a basilica minor by Pope Pius XI in 1936. The present basilica is located on a hill, where in the twelfth-century, stood a wooden figure of Mary, the Mother of God. According to a chronicle from 1218, the blind Jan from Raszewo regained his sight there. After the event, many pilgrims began visiting the area. Shortly afterwards, an altar, together with candlesticks and a baptismal font, was placed by the statue under the tree. In 1263, a wooden church was built on the hill.

In 1512, Ludwik von Panwitz raised a greater church, constructed out of brick. However, the church was destroyed during the Thirty Years' War. Between 1695 and 1711, a new church was built, but quickly began to crumble and was deconstructed in 1714. Between 1715 and 1723, another church was built by Count Franciszek Antony von Goetzen, which stands to the present day.

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Details

Founded: 1715-1723
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pav Ko (7 months ago)
interesting place
Pawel P. (9 months ago)
Absolutely amazing place for those who don't expect much in the area of wild nature. Good shape, worth see it not only inside but surroundings as well
Dariusz Panasiuk (11 months ago)
A must see place
Koos Reitsma (2 years ago)
Somehow a hidden gem in this region. From the outside it doesn't look so big, once inside you'll undertand how big and high this cathedral is. It makes you think how such a cathedral ended up in such a village. The inside of the Cathedral is probably typical the Polish style: warm, lots of collors, high, beautiful paintings/fresco's on the walls and on the ceiling.
Janusz Engel (3 years ago)
ok
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