Grafenort Castle

Gorzanów, Poland

Grafenort (Gorzanów) Castle is a former stately residence in the Kłodzko Land of the Lower Silesia. A sixteenth-century German foundation, it has been in the hands of the von Herberstein family since the second half of the seventeenth century until 1930 — hence its name, and one of the former names of the village in which it is situated.

The construction of currently existing castle was undertaken in 1573. In the years of 1653-1657 Johann Friedrich von Herberstein rebuilt the stronghold. The latter transformation took place in 1735. The castle was devastated during the World War II but after the war the attempts at its renovation were made.

The Castle, comprising over 100 interior chambers within its structure, is surrounded by 6.6 hectares of palace gardens that once were one its greatest glories, the views extending from some vantage points being described as having a mesmeric effect on the viewer.

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Details

Founded: 1573
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Jarek Narbutt (19 months ago)
Świetne miejsce. Właściciel przepięknie opowiada historię pałacu i jego mieszkańców. Gorąco polecam zobaczenie. Załączam kilka zdjęć
Michał Zalewski (19 months ago)
Fantastyczne miejsce, cudowna przewodniczka która jest z powołania i kocha to miejsce. Polecam każdemu odwiedzającemu
Piotr Teicher (19 months ago)
Świetny przykład lokalnej historii, do tego pani przewodnik z pasją opowiedziała o dziejach pałacu i jego konserwacji pokazując także zdjęcia sprzed rozpoczęcia prac. Bardzo polecam tę ukrytą perłę.
Marek Wojciechowski (20 months ago)
Ratowanie zabytku mocno poprzednio zaniedbanego to trudna sprawa, gdy brakuje własnych funduszy i trzeba liczyć na dotacje. Mamy nadzieję, że pałac doczeka kompleksowej rewitalizacji. Ostatnie 4 lata to jednak zastój.
Zbigniew Aleksander Piotrowicz (2 years ago)
If for some strange reason you have been lost around, you definitely should visit this palace. It's being renovated right now, but probably you will be able to visit it for free.
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