Jawor Castle was originally a wooden stronghold until Duke Bolesław the Tall built a stone tower house. The castle has been a seat of both the Piast dynasty and the Duchy of Jawor-Świdnica. Several politically significant events took place in the castle during the Middle Ages. In 1648, the castle saw damage when it was besieged by soldiers loyal to the Holy Roman Empire, but it was renovated later during the same century (1663-65). Another renovation was carried out in 1705, when the clock tower was repaired.

Later during the 18th century, Frederick the Great converted the castle into a prison, a role which it would keep until 1956. Until 1821, it also housed an asylum for mentally ill. After 1888, the hitherto all-male prison became an all-female prison, and stayed in this capacity until 1945. During World War II, it was used as such also by the German authorities who among others imprisoned several French women here. A memorial commemorating them has been erected in the castle courtyard. After 1945, it housed political prisoners and former soldiers of the Home Army.

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Zamkowa 2, Jawor, Poland
See all sites in Jawor

Details

Founded: 1663-1665
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Acherontas (11 months ago)
Zamek Piastowski atrakcja turystyczna dla wielbicieli kultury średniowieczno- zamkowej oraz pewnych pozostałości po obwarowaniach i zabudowach około zamkowych, obecnie z racji braku inwestycji i remontów oraz postępującej katastrofy znajduje się w fazie powolnego acz ciągłego rozkładu i zniszczenia fasady oraz ogólnej substancji kultury zamkowej .
Luiza Jaworowska (12 months ago)
Zaniedbany ...aż boli... ale w sumie piękny obiekt ze smutna przeszłością. Gdyby miał jednego właściciela to pewnie by o niego zadbał. Teraz jest "dobrem wspolnym" kilku instytucji, firm i stowarzyszeń .Dziedziniec dostępny. Jeśli traficie tam między majem a pażdziernikiem to mozna za darmo wejść na wieżę.
Joanna Jaziewicz (2 years ago)
Very sad, building left unattended, almost. Partially used as a magazine, etc.
Joanna Zurek (2 years ago)
Very intriguing place although not very spectacular. Old castle converted into housing, a bit difficult to find and seems neglected.
Mariusz Szczerbinski (2 years ago)
There is a new attraction as from May 2018 you can walk the castle tower and see surrounding landscape. Other than that the castle does not offer more, it is used commercially and most of the place is rented by local small businesses.
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