Jawor Church of Peace

Jawor, Poland

The Churches of Peace in Jawor and Świdnica, the largest timber-framed religious buildings in Europe, were built in the former Silesia in the mid-17th century, amid the religious strife that followed the Peace of Westphalia. Constrained by the physical and political conditions, the Churches of Peace bear testimony to the quest for religious freedom and are a rare expression of Lutheran ideology in an idiom generally associated with the Catholic Church. Since 2001, the remaining churches are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

The church in Jawor has capacity of 5,500. It was constructed by architect Albrecht von Saebisch (1610–1688) from Wroclaw and was finished in 1655. The 200 paintings inside by were done by Georg Flegel in 1671–1681. The altar, by Martin Schneider, dates to 1672, the original organ of J. Hoferichter from Legnica (then German Liegnitz) of 1664 was replaced in 1855–1856 by Adolf Alexander Lummert.

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Address

park Pokoju 2, Jawor, Poland
See all sites in Jawor

Details

Founded: 1655
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karol Wąsowski (18 months ago)
A must see in the region. It has a very special history and the architecture is also unique
no fear (19 months ago)
Fantastic historical church
Urszula Kużelewska (19 months ago)
Extremely interesting, unique church
Ms Susanne (2 years ago)
I would love to say this was worth it but on a 12hr trip from Berlin to Krakow I would have preferred to keep driving... It wasn't even open so we didn't see inside
Jadwiga Lawinski (2 years ago)
I visited this Church.It was impressive to observe the murals depicting the Old Testament on one side and the New Testament on the other side.The Church is under remodeling.I also noticed the portrait of Martin Luther.The architecture is beautiful.This Church was the First Protestant Church approved in Poland.It is located in the town of Jawor.
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