Son Marroig is a country house & museum dedicated to the Archduke Ludwig Salvator of Austria (1847-1915). The Archduke's home at Son Marroig, outside Deia, has been turned into a shrine to his memory, with his photographs, paintings and books and a museum devoted to his life in 1928. In the gardens is a white marble rotunda, made from Carrara marble and imported from Italy, where you can sit and gaze at the Na Foradada ('pierced rock') peninsula, jutting out to sea with a gaping 18-m hole at its centre. Ask at the house for permission to walk onto the peninsula. The house plays host to concerts throughout the year.

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Founded: 1928
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pavel Sedlacek (3 years ago)
This place exceeded all our expectations. The building and interiors are nice, well maintained. And... breathtaking view.
Anupam Sinha (3 years ago)
Must visit...amazing view of ocean from mountain uptop. Best suited for sunset viewing espically if you have kids or elderly and you DO NOT want to climb many stairs - you can directly drive to the point and walk like 2mins to the edge for sunset. Few restaurants also at the view point.
Tom Etty (3 years ago)
Looks amazing from the photos on the internet. I arrived there 3 o’clock on a Friday afternoon and it’s CLOSED?!
Dušan Okanović (3 years ago)
A truly magical place. You can feel it in the house itself and everywhere around.
Shelley Fox (3 years ago)
Lovely holiday to Majorca. On the east side of Majorca. You can walk around the house and grounds and the view was breath taking
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