Palma Cathedral

Palma, Spain

Built by the Crown of Aragon on the site of a Moorish-era mosque, Palma cathedral is 121 metres long, 55 metres wide and its nave is 44 metres tall.

Designed in the Catalan Gothic style but with Northern European influences, it was begun by King James I of Aragon in 1229 but only finished in 1601. It sits within the old city of Palma atop the former citadel of the Roman city, between the Royal Palace of La Almudaina and the episcopal palace. It also overlooks the Parc de la Mar and the Mediterranean Sea.

Light pours in through the rose window - one of the world's largest, 12m across and studded with 1,236 pieces of stained glass. The columns are ringed with wrought-iron candelabra designed by Gaudi.  His most controversial addition is the unfinished Crown of Thorns, fashioned from cardboard and cork and suspended above the altar.  Be sure to walk around to the south front, facing the sea, to look at the Portal del Mirador a 15th-century door by Guillem Sagrera featuring scenes from the Last Supper.

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Address

Plaça de la Seu 5, Palma, Spain
See all sites in Palma

Details

Founded: 1229
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elizavetha T (18 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral! Well worth a visit! We went on Sunday during a one hour period where entrance is free, and walked around for a bit. Everything is clean, beautiful stained glass, and amazing design!
Małgorzata Kokot (18 months ago)
The cathedral really makes a great impression from outside. But information on the information table in front of the entrance are incorrect. I really wanted to participate in the mass on the second day of Easter but the door were closed. I just can assume that you don't want to let tourists inside while the celebration. But when I supposed to come to be allowed to participate in the mass? 15 minutes earlier? 20 minutes earlier? It's a church, not an exclusive club. And churches should be open, especially in the celebration time. Come on.
Oskar Malmberg (18 months ago)
Good service but we ordered prawns and they were with the shell on. I have never seen anyone eat them with Shells in my entire life. I tried but its not good.maybe THE other food is better...
Roselyne Marot (18 months ago)
Beautiful place. A lot of superb statues, artistic scenes. Audio guide available. Don't be afraid if you see a big bee-line outside. It goes in very quickly. Worth visiting! :)
Nate Betts (18 months ago)
Absolutely stunning. High roof have allowed this beautiful cathedral to house so many interesting sights. Alcoves line the walls with altars and prayer areas. While we visited, we also heard a small orchestra practice; truly an added bonus. Well worth a visit, when your tours fall through.
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