Church of St. Jaume

Alcúdia, Spain

The construction of St. Jaume's Church is a consequence of the increasing devotion that Alcudia and the neighbouring villages felt for Saint Christ. It was believed that Saint Christ had sweated water and blood in 1507 in the cave of Sant Marti (on the outskirts of the city) to implore for rain during a drought. The first stone was laid on 8 December 1675 and the works finished in 1697. The chapel is notable for the central dome and four side chapels along with the altar piece which is a spectacular work of baroque art. The latter shows the l'horror vacui and is the work of sculptor Mateu Joan i Serra and was made between 1699 and 1703. The altarpiece was restored in 2007 on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of Saint Christ.

The main altar piece was constructed over two periods, the stonemasonry is that of sculptor Llorenc Ferrer i Marti, the rest was made by Miquel Arcas. In the centre of the altarpiece is an image of Saint James, patron saint of Alcudia and the parish.

The construction is neo-Gothic with a major reconstruction of part of the building being completed in 1893.

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Details

Founded: 1675-1697
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mike Pinter (18 months ago)
Great place to browse, shop, eat and for sightseeing local history
Camus Sartre (19 months ago)
Should be bulldozed as we shouldn't seriously be building mock places of worship and encouraging people to believe in some muppet walking on water or parting seas. C'mon!!!
Sarah Harding (20 months ago)
This costs one euro each to enter and you will see some of the most impressive Catholic art in a church of anywhere! The window was designed by the same person who was responsible for the one in Palma Cathedral so this is a chance to see something impressive without needing an expensive trip to the capitol. There is also a museum of religious artifacts in the back of the church and they range back hundreds of years.
Luca Romoli (2 years ago)
Really beautiful and unexpected. The side Chapels are nicely decorated and the whole place is worth a visit when in Alcudia.
Kim Skak Larsen (2 years ago)
Just saw the church from the outside, but we really enjoyed walking around next to and on top of the city wall.
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