Basilica de Sant Francesc

Palma, Spain

Basilica de Sant Francesc origins from the 13th-century and was remodelled after it was struck by lightning in the 17th century. It is typically Mallorcan - a massive, forbidding sandstone wall with a delicately carved postal and a rose window at the centre.

You enter through lovely & peaceful Gothic cloisters with orange and lemon trees and a well at the centre. Inside the church is the tomb of Ramon Llull (1235-1316), the Catalan mystic who became a hermit following a failed seduction attempt and was later stoned to death attempting to convert Muslims in Tunisia. His statue can be seen on the Palma seafront.

Outside the basilica is a statue of another famous Mallorcan missionary, Fray Junípero Serra, who once lived in the monastery here. The streets behind the church, once home to jewellers and Jewish traders.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.seemallorca.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Edyta Kusmirek (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, worth to see
Debbie Moe (2 years ago)
Awesome. Peaceful. Enlightening. Spiritual.
Lorraine A (2 years ago)
This is a ‘must see’ in Palma, absolutely stunning. Enter via the cloisters and allow yourself plenty of time to soak up the history and atmosphere. Truly stunning.
TONI GÓMEZ CERDÁ (2 years ago)
One of the "must" in Palma if you visit. Great basilica and extremely beautiful gothic cloister.
tut nix zur Sache (3 years ago)
Very nice place and good alternative to the big and crowded Cathedral. Here you have a total quite atmosphere and with the luck we had an outstanding pipe organ concert/exercise for free. Nice and calm and totally recommendable.
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