Royal Palace of La Almudaina

Palma, Spain

The Royal Palace of La Almudaina, Spanish Palacio Real de La Almudaina, is the Alcázar (fortified palace) of Palma, the capital city of the Island of Majorca, Spain. Built as an Arabian Fort, the crown claimed it as official royal residence in the early 14th century. Inside are many empty rooms, however, when King James II began restoration, his design plan included the encompassing of the small, romanesque Chapel of Saint Anne. It stands opposite the dramatic Palma Cathedral with commanding views over the Bay of Palma.

The palace is owned by the Spanish government and operated by Patrimonio Nacional, an agency of the Minister of the Presidency that manages assets of the State for the Crown. Nowadays, the Royal Family uses it as an official residence for ceremonies and State receptions, having their private summer residence in the Palace of Marivent on the outskirts of Palma.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul J Smith Ogarrio (8 months ago)
Stepped in history, It is now used for receptions and other high end social functions when the Spanish Royals are here. The Palace itself is beautiful. However, curb your enthusiasm - other than ornate tapestries on walls scattered throughout the complex, there’s isn’t much else to see. $7 euro per person entry. You can easily visit Palma’s Cathedral afterwards which is located next to it.
Robert Matthews (14 months ago)
Easily accessible if staying in Palma City Some lovely artwork and furniture from antiquity and the various rooms and courtyard give anyone who likes history an insight into life in a different age.
Robert Matthews (14 months ago)
Easily accessible if staying in Palma City Some lovely artwork and furniture from antiquity and the various rooms and courtyard give anyone who likes history an insight into life in a different age.
Hrvoje Šandula (15 months ago)
Cool place, would recommend to visit!
Tomasz G (15 months ago)
Nice place
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