Royal Palace of La Almudaina

Palma, Spain

The Royal Palace of La Almudaina, Spanish Palacio Real de La Almudaina, is the Alcázar (fortified palace) of Palma, the capital city of the Island of Majorca, Spain. Built as an Arabian Fort, the crown claimed it as official royal residence in the early 14th century. Inside are many empty rooms, however, when King James II began restoration, his design plan included the encompassing of the small, romanesque Chapel of Saint Anne. It stands opposite the dramatic Palma Cathedral with commanding views over the Bay of Palma.

The palace is owned by the Spanish government and operated by Patrimonio Nacional, an agency of the Minister of the Presidency that manages assets of the State for the Crown. Nowadays, the Royal Family uses it as an official residence for ceremonies and State receptions, having their private summer residence in the Palace of Marivent on the outskirts of Palma.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Indira Freeman (18 months ago)
Spectacular! Must visit. Sad that one part of the palace was under the construction, but enjoyed what I was able to see.
Jonathan Penamala (18 months ago)
Great view of history although there were some resrictions on the furniture within the palace, which prevented getting up close to the craftsmanship. The price of entry was affordable ( a proper bargain) and ultimately very much worth it. I would recommend going in small groups that would be able to take their time reading the information dotted around the palace as well bringing a camera for a few good shots.
Valerie Litwinko (18 months ago)
So i came here without knowing what to expect, the majority of the palace is tapestries, and non too fine in particular. I did not think it was worth the 7 euro price of admission. However, the very worst part was the incessant security guard hassling you and following you around, and i understand correcting people, but it was done in such a rude manner. It is a fine example of architecture, so save yourself the hassle and just look from the outside.
Persi Cleric (19 months ago)
If you're interested in history you can probably spend more than half of the day here, if not, the place itself is interesting and pretty, especially during the sunset
Lisa Phuong (19 months ago)
The palace is small but there is a lot of history here. It’s worth taking the audio guide. Located next to the cathedral and you can buy tickets to see both attractions.
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