Alaro castle is perched on top a rocky mountain above the town in the west of Mallorca. A popular walk from the town (or further up the hill if you prefer to drive) takes you to a ruined castle and hilltop chapel offering spectacular views of the Tramuntana mountains and over towards Palma and all the way to the sea.

A castle has stood on this site since Moorish times; it was so impregnable that the Arab commander was able to hold out for two years after the Christian conquest. Later, in 1285, two heroes of Mallorcan independence, Cabrit and Brassa, defended the castle against Alfonso III of Aragon and were burned alive on a spit when he finally took it by storm. Their punishment was a consequence of their impudent defiance of the king. The present ruins date from the 15th century and seem almost to grow out of the rock, dominating the landscape for miles around.

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Address

Unnamed Road, Alaró, Spain
See all sites in Alaró

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.seemallorca.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

slamartist (3 months ago)
really nice hiking spot with incredible views and a small café on top.
Andrew Barke (4 months ago)
Spectacular location with special views. Take cash as they don't take cards.
Nataša Jeraj Kampuš (8 months ago)
Must-do. We did trekking from Es Verger restaurant with family and enjoyed every minute. The drive from Alaro to the restaurant is not for inexperienced driver. The hike to castle took us about an hour and views are amazing! In short time you get the flavour of Serra de Tramontana. At the end you deserve lamb shoulders or goat with rosemary-both are delicious.
Oli Shaw (16 months ago)
Views worth the hike and great to get a drink and snack at the top
Michael Shiel (23 months ago)
Well worth the effort. You can drive most of the way but the track gets much rougher after the cafe stop, you need good ground clearance on your car. Fantastic views.
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