Castell del Rei

Pollença, Spain

Pollença’s most emblematic monument is the Castell del Rei, one of the island’s three rock fortresses in the Valley of Ternelles, approximately 492 meters high. In Roman times, it was used as a fortification, and during the Muslim period it was (along with the Castle of Alaró) the last stronghold of resistance from the troops of Jaume I of Aragon, who invaded Mallorca in 1229. They resisted until March 1231.

Another prominent historical fact related to the castle was the resistance offered in 1343, and during a three-month siege, by the last of those faithful to the king of Mallorca Jaume III, after he lost his kingdom and had annexed to the Crown of Aragon.

The castle was used as a watchtower rather than grounds for defence. It was abandoned in the 18th century and is currently in ruins, of private ownership and closed to the public. Currently the road leading to the castle has been reason for controversy. Although it is a public road, the owners  have managed to restrict access.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Pollença, Spain
See all sites in Pollença

Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Irene Fernández Nuevo (2 years ago)
Ramon, el guia, una pasada! Nos ha encsntado!
Magda Cáceres (2 years ago)
Un paseo increible! Fuimos un grupo de amigos y hemos quedado satisfechos con la visita...la recomiendo totalmente, quedamos muy agradecidos con el guía! Tiene mucha paciencia y conocimiento lo cual te transmite! Se nota que le gusta lo que hace...es una pena no poder subir al castillo pero entendemos que es para preservar la naturaleza!
Vanessa Sanchez (3 years ago)
Es una pena q ya no se pueda visitar el castillo ni la cala, haces un recorrido acompañado de un guía que te ayuda en el avistamiento de buitres y te facilitan unos prismáticos. El castillo lo ves de lejos, igual que la cala... Total unos 13km, si te gusta ver aves, es una excursión para ti... si no.... yo no la recomiendo, te vas a quedar con las ganas y además en época de calor es horrible.
Frank Witthinrich (3 years ago)
Leichte Wanderung über gute wirtschaftswege die man aber mit dem weg zur carla de Ray kombinieren sollte da ist der Aufstieg weil der so lang ist jedoch nicht zu unterschätzen einziger Nachteil ist das vorherige einholen der wandergenehmigung
Tony Flisch (4 years ago)
Stunning walk through managed woodland. Need permit from tourist office
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Palazzo Colonna

The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings built in part over ruins of an old Roman Serapeum, and has belonged to the prestigious Colonna family for over twenty generations.

The first part of the palace dates from the 13th century, and tradition holds that the building hosted Dante in his visit to Rome. The first documentary mention notes that the property hosted Cardinal Giovanni and Giacomo Colonna in the 13th century. It was also home to Cardinal Oddone Colonna before he ascended to the papacy as Martin V (1417–1431).

With his passing, the palace was sacked during feuds, and the main property passed into the hands of the Della Rovere family. It returned to the Colonna family when Marcantonio I Colonna married Lucrezia Gara Franciotti Della Rovere, the niece of pope Julius II. The Colonna"s alliance to the Habsburg power, likely protected the palace from looting during the Sack of Rome (1527).

Starting with Filippo Colonna (1578–1639) many changes have refurbished and create a unitary complex around a central garden. Architects including Girolamo Rainaldi and Paolo Marucelli labored on specific projects. Only in the 17th and 18th centuries were the main facades completed. Much of this design was completed by Antonio del Grande (including the grand gallery), and Girolamo Fontana (decoration of gallery). In the 18th century, the long low facade designed by Nicola Michetti with later additions by Paolo Posi with taller corner blocks (facing Piazza Apostoli) was constructed recalls earlier structures resembling a fortification.

The main gallery (completed 1703) and the masterful Colonna art collection was acquired after 1650 by both the cardinal Girolamo I Colonna and his nephew the Connestabile Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna and includes works by Lorenzo Monaco, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Palma the Elder, Salviati, Bronzino, Tintoretto, Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci (painting of The Beaneater), Guercino, Francesco Albani, Muziano and Guido Reni. Ceiling frescoes by Filippo Gherardi, Giovanni Coli, Sebastiano Ricci, and Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari celebrate the role of Marcantonio II Colonna in the battle of Lepanto (1571). The gallery is open to the public on Saturday mornings.

The older wing of the complex known as the Princess Isabelle"s apartments, but once housing Martin V"s library and palace, contains frescoes by Pinturicchio, Antonio Tempesta, Crescenzio Onofri, Giacinto Gimignani, and Carlo Cesi. It contains a collection of landscapes and genre scenes by painters like Gaspard Dughet, Caspar Van Wittel (Vanvitelli), and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

Along with the possessions of the Doria-Pamphilij and Pallavacini-Rospigliosi families, this is one of the largest private art collections in Rome.