Capdepera Castle

Capdepera, Spain

The Castle of Capdepera is one of the largest castles on the Majorca island. Its construction began in 310, but in the fourteenth century it was rebuilt on the remains of a Muslim village.

The Castle of Capdepera is important to the island as it was from here that the surrender of Menorca, the island neighbouring Majorca in the Balearic archipelago, was accomplished. King James I of Aragon, having conquered Majorca, decided he needed his troops for the future conquest of Valencia. He devised a ploy to deceive the Muslims residing on Menorca and cause them to surrender. To do this, he ordered a large number of bonfires lit in Capdepera so that they were visible from the neighbouring island. This was to make the Saracen Menorcans believe that a large army had camped there and were preparing to invade Menorca. The ruse worked. So finally, at this very castle, James I signed the Treaty of Capdepera, through which the Menorcan Muslims were allowed to remain there in submission to the King of Aragon under tribute.

The first construction of a fortress on this site was by Romans. It was later enlarged by the Moors. It was destroyed during Christian invasions but they later constructed another structure in the same location in the fourteenth century.

King James II (1285-1295) having already founded the town of Capdepera in 1300, ordered the population of the area, which had been scattered, to build the walled enclosure surrounding one of its watchtowers now known as Miquel Nunis. Its strategic location on a hill allowed them to view the adjacent lands and sea channel separating the two islands.

The castle was occupied by military troops up to 1854 when it was abandoned. From then until 1983 it was under private ownership. At that time the owners donated it to the Capdepera Town Council. Today it remains open for tourist viewing throughout the year.

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Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Kovačič (15 months ago)
Small city walls. Splendid for loosing an hour especially if you like medieval themed things.
Liam Thornton (16 months ago)
Really interesting place to visit, staff polite, welcoming and helpful. Cheap entry price for the family and fantastic views!
Bill Freid (16 months ago)
Compared to other castles in Europe it is a 3 stat, for Northern Mallirca it is a 5 star. It actually has historical descriptions in several languages. It has a brief history of the castle and the military history of the area. Great views of the area.
Stephen Kidson (17 months ago)
Visiting this 14th century structure is by far one of my greatest memories from all my holidays! It's breathtaking and the views are spectacular!
Pearl Xia (2 years ago)
A beautiful castle with great view! It’s easy to get there by car. €3 entrance and kids are free. Even there is not many exhibitions but the view is worth the price already. A nice place for kids, too.
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