Capdepera Castle

Capdepera, Spain

The Castle of Capdepera is one of the largest castles on the Majorca island. Its construction began in 310, but in the fourteenth century it was rebuilt on the remains of a Muslim village.

The Castle of Capdepera is important to the island as it was from here that the surrender of Menorca, the island neighbouring Majorca in the Balearic archipelago, was accomplished. King James I of Aragon, having conquered Majorca, decided he needed his troops for the future conquest of Valencia. He devised a ploy to deceive the Muslims residing on Menorca and cause them to surrender. To do this, he ordered a large number of bonfires lit in Capdepera so that they were visible from the neighbouring island. This was to make the Saracen Menorcans believe that a large army had camped there and were preparing to invade Menorca. The ruse worked. So finally, at this very castle, James I signed the Treaty of Capdepera, through which the Menorcan Muslims were allowed to remain there in submission to the King of Aragon under tribute.

The first construction of a fortress on this site was by Romans. It was later enlarged by the Moors. It was destroyed during Christian invasions but they later constructed another structure in the same location in the fourteenth century.

King James II (1285-1295) having already founded the town of Capdepera in 1300, ordered the population of the area, which had been scattered, to build the walled enclosure surrounding one of its watchtowers now known as Miquel Nunis. Its strategic location on a hill allowed them to view the adjacent lands and sea channel separating the two islands.

The castle was occupied by military troops up to 1854 when it was abandoned. From then until 1983 it was under private ownership. At that time the owners donated it to the Capdepera Town Council. Today it remains open for tourist viewing throughout the year.

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Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michal Tomko (10 months ago)
Great viewpoint of northeast part of Mallorca. To enter the castle you have to pay 3 € as an adult. It is not that much but apart from the view, there is not anything else to look at, because what used to be a castle is now a ruin. There many benches where you can rest and toilet. If u get to the highest part you can ring a pretty lound bell. If you come by car, you can choose from many parkings in town and then walk, it is not that far. I would not put this place on the must see list.
Lawrence Tribe-Endt (12 months ago)
Lovely little trek from the pretty town below. Stunning scenery and beautiful views from the top. Nice to get to know a little more about the history.
Yonathan Stein (12 months ago)
The best is the view but sure the place is also nice. Be ready that they close at 19 and last entrance 18:30. Price is 3 euros.
Magda Kolanek (12 months ago)
Nice castle. Price only €3, kids free. Worth to see it if you are around.
Ruben Fincias (13 months ago)
get ready for stepping up. Ticket 3€ I did not get in.
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