Santueri Castle

Felanitx, Spain

Santueri Castle sits on top of a rocky outcrop some 475 metres above sea level. It is a stunning, well preserved castle with remarkable views of the south east of Mallorca and the Cabrera Islands on a clear day. The present walls date from the 14th century but a fortification has existed here since Roman times.

The castle's surrounding area has many caves, with archaeological remains much older, that highlight a continuous use of this space since prehistoric times, documented from Bronze Age period (about 2,200 BC), which could be defined as a sacred place of worship. Some archaeological samplings in the interior of the castle have revealed remains of Roman and Byzantine occupations.

It is believed that the enclosure already was used as a refuge, by the existing population in the surroundings, during the Islamic invasion of Mallorca (by the year 903 AD), and later returned to be used during the Christian reconquest by King Jaume I, in 1229.

It is from this time, the beginning of the 13th century, when we have more information about the Santueri Castle, which came into the hands of count Nunyo Sans until his death in year 1241, when it was inherited by his nephew the King Jaume I of Mallorca.

But, in 1248, during the conquest of Mallorca by King Alfonso III of Aragon, the castle's resistance was low, and surrendered after a few days of siege. From this date until mid-fourteenth century the castle was in operation at the continuing clashes over the ownership of the Kingdom of Mallorca.

Then the castle worked as a surveillance against possible attacks from the sea. At the end of the fifteenth century it is practically obsolete, though it was a point of resistance during the majorcan movement called “the Germanies', facing sieges between years 1522 and 1524, being the only one of the three majorcan rocky castles that remained loyal to the Crown, in all times.

After this stage, during 17th and 18th centuries, the castle remained more or less active against possible threats coming from the sea, but its degradation and loss of importance were increasing. In year 1,811 it was sold by the Spanish State to a private owner, and totally abandoned its role of a fortress.

You can now enter its interior where you will find a splendid central tower, ruins of ancient defensive structures, the old keeper's room, a cistern and many other constructions that tell the story of the life inside the castle. Additionally, you can enjoy the walls and towers and of course the views. There are plenty of hiking and cycling trails in the area, or you can drive right up to the castle by taking the road from Felanitx to Santanyi.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dominik Schmidt (17 months ago)
Sehr sehr schöne Aussicht. Rundumblick über die Insel. Es ist nur zu empfehlen!
A (18 months ago)
Las vistas son espectaculares! Las ruinas del castillo complementan el paisaje. Muy amable la guía de la entrada. Gracias!
clare mckinnon (18 months ago)
Beautiful place with amazing views
Patrocinio Cruz (19 months ago)
Muy interesante, las vistas espectaculares. La lastima es que está cerrado, según nos dijo un vecino del pueblo lleva varios años cerrado. La verdad fastidia bastante hacerte un montón de kilómetros y que llegues arriba del todo, en la cima de la montaña y te lo encuentres cerrado, sin aviso ninguno.
Vanessa Donoso (20 months ago)
Bonito castillo . Lo único malo es que fuimos en domingo y estaba cerrada . La apertura ponía a las 10:30 y el cierre a las 18 :00 precio de la entrada 4 euros ... volveremos porque nos quedamos con las ganas de entrar dentro y fotografía.
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