Sanctuary de Sant Salvador

Felanitx, Spain

Sanctuary de Sant Salvador, an old hermitage, 509m above sea level at the highest point of the Serra de Llevant was the senior house of Mallorca's monastic order and the last to lose its monks in 1992.

The walls were built in the 14th century to protect the town from pirates or invaders. There are walkways and a simple cafeteria along the walls, and a neoclassical church, which was built in 1832.

It is still a popular place of pilgrimage, flanked by two enormous landmarks - to one side a 14m stone cross, to the other a 35m column topped by a statue of Christ holding out his right hand in blessing. The views from the terrace take in Cabrera, Cap de Formentor and several other hilltop sanctuaries dotted across the plain. From the statue of Christ you look out towards the Castell de Santueri, a 14th century rock castle built into the cliffs on the site of a ruined Arab fortress. 

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Felanitx, Spain
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Founded: 1348
Category: Religious sites in Spain

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Hugaerts (2 years ago)
very interesting sight with beautiful views and ideal for cycling enthusiasts who would like to climb the mountain on which the church is located
Sydney Martinie (2 years ago)
Hiked up at dawn and loved the view! You can go off-road but follow the little markers. At sunrise there were almost no cars, just cyclists and joggers. It’s peaceful and you have a 360 view of the island ? The hotel and restaurant at the top look amazing, worth checking out in the future.
Leanne Magnus (2 years ago)
We loved visiting this place. The views are spectacular!! It wasn't very busy at all so was nice to walk around at our leisure. The windy road to the top (we drive) takes around 11 minutes to get to the top- it's so worth it! You can also drive half way and walk the rest or walk/ run/ cycle if you're crazy. Enjoy!
Grant Daft (2 years ago)
Excellent drive up and great views from the top. Sanctuary itself was an impressive building and location, but don't expect to see much inside. Cafe at the top with outside seating. Make sure you climb to the cross before leaving; there is a small parking area on the left on the way down.
Eric (3 years ago)
Amazing views!
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