Temple of Athena Nike

Athens, Greece

The Temple of Athena Nike on the Acropolis of Athens was named after the Greek goddess. Built around 420 BCE, the temple is the earliest fully Ionic temple on the Acropolis. It was a prominent position on a steep bastion at the south west corner of the Acropolis to the right of the entrance, the Propylaea. In contrast to the Acropolis proper, a walled sanctuary entered through the Propylaea, the Victory Sanctuary was open, entered from the Propylaea's southwest wing and from a narrow stair on the north. The sheer walls of its bastion were protected on the north, west, and south by the Nike Parapet, named for its frieze of Nikai celebrating victory and sacrificing to their patroness, Athena Nike.

In the sixth century BCE a cult of Athena Nike was established and a small temple was built using Mycenaean fortification and Cyclopean masonry. After the temple was demolished by the Persians in 480 BCE a new temple was built over the remains. The new temple construction was underway in 449 BCE and was finished around 420 BCE.

The temple sat untouched until it was demolished in 1686 by the Turks who used the stones to build defences. In 1834 the temple was reconstructed after the independence of Greece. In 1998 the temple was dismantled so that the crumbling concrete floor could be replaced and its frieze was removed and placed in the new Acropolis Museum. The temple is often closed to visitors as work continues. The new museum exhibit consists of fragments of the site before the Persians were thought to have destroyed it in 480 BCE. Sculptures from the friezes have been salvaged such as: deeds of Hercules, statue of Moscophoros, a damaged sculpture of a goddess credited to Praxiteles and the Rampin horseman, as well as epigraphic dedications, decrees, and stelae.

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Acropolis, Athens, Greece
See all sites in Athens

Details

Founded: 420 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Greece

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul H (39 days ago)
A slightly strenuous walk if you're not that fit on what is at times slippery marble, but, it's another of those places you really should visit before you die. Very busy. Good amenities.
Kayes Ahmed (41 days ago)
It was just ok, nothing special for me and wasn't excited temple.
Anna Wilkes (46 days ago)
We got here really early in the morning, we were the first in the queue! It is better this way to avoid the crowds, as we were leaving the bus tours were just starting to arrive.
Karine B (3 months ago)
I loved that Temple. I highly recommend you go see it.
Jose Lejin P J (8 months ago)
Excellent historical place to visit. The Temple of Athena Nike is the temple on the Acropolis of Athens dedicated to the goddess Athena Nike. It was built around 420 BC. This temple is the earliest fully ionic temple on the Acropolis. It has a prominent position on a steep bastion at the south west corner of the Acropolis to the right of the entrance.
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