Taivassalo Church

Taivassalo, Finland

Taivassalo Church is the oldest of the three medieval stone churches in Finland that are dedicated to the Holy Cross. The construction of the church is believed to have begun between the years 1425 to 1440. In 1460s, the third aisle was built and the inner walls were decorated with new murals. It was the first time in Finland that frescos were painted to nearly all important surfaces of a church by a group of professional artists.

The medieval altarpiece as well as wooden sculptures of Taivassalo Church were donated to The National Museum of Finland in 1890. However, Taivassalo Church still has a magnificent triumph crucifix above the altar, in front of the chancel window. This crucifix is one of the oldest and best preserved crucifixes in Finland. The rococo front of the organ, which is unusual by Finnish standards, has remained intact ever since 1767 although the organ has been replaced several times.

As a whole, the church with its murals looks much the same as it would have looked at the end of the Middle Ages.

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Details

Founded: 1425-1440
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kari Alho (2 years ago)
Nätti paikka
Jari Hautala (2 years ago)
Kaunis pieni kirkko. Sisällä en käynyt.
Raija Eronen (2 years ago)
Nooa-pojan kellovideot (3 years ago)
No kun se on kirkko
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