Louhisaari Manor

Masku, Finland

Louhisaari manor castle was built in the late medieval ages by the remarkable Fleming noble family. The present main building was completed in the 1650s and represents the rare palatial architecture in Finland. The grounds have an extensive English-style park, complete with paths. Louhisaari belonged to the Fleming family for over three hundred years. The lack of money forced them to sell the manor to the family of Mannerheim in 1791. Finland’s Marshall C.G.E. Mannerheim was born there in 1867.

The festive floor and the service floor are in 17th-century style and furnished to match. The middle floor, where the actual living quarters were, was modernised during the 18th and 19th centuries, and the rooms in this part of the castle reflect the interior-decoration styles of that time.

Government of Finland bought Louhisaari in 1961 and opened it to the public couple of years later.
Nowadays it’s open in summer time. Admission to the museum only in the company of a guide, tours in Finnish at half hourly intervals.

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Address

Louhisaarentie, Masku, Finland
See all sites in Masku

Details

Founded: ca. 1650
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ALI TOLVANEN (2 years ago)
Nice to see and feel
Unna Äkäslompolo (2 years ago)
One of the most beautiful Manor Houses in Finland. White main building is a sight in the middle of peaceful countryside. Recommended to visit!
Hannu Kuusisto (2 years ago)
Kannattaa käydä sillä tämä on palanen Varsinais-Suomalaista historiaa jota ei saa unohtaa,parasta omalta kohdalta oli kun tapasi kartanon puutarhurin joka esitelmöi työn ohessa harvinaisia kasveja asiantuntevasti ja selkokielellä että varmaan ymmärsi.Suuri kiitos tuolle sympaattiselle henkilölle joka jaksoi polttavasta helteestä huolimatta pitää todella pitkän opettavaisen luennon meille.
Savvas Potitsopoulos (3 years ago)
Nice and peaceful place to spend to relax middle of natur
Hunter SS (4 years ago)
gorgeous park, running hares and foxes
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