Naantali Church

Naantali, Finland

The Naantali Church was originally part of the Catholic Convent of St. Bridget. The convent was built between years 1443 and 1462 and church probably later in the end of 15th century. Nowadays the church is the only remaining building of the convent, which was closed during Reformation in 1540s. Naantali Church is damaged several times by fire and the present interior is mostly from the modern times except the pulpit (1622) and artefacts. There are lot of medieval items in church, for example crucifix from the monastery, wooden statues and magnificent altarpiece.

The church is situated in the old town of Naantali, which is mostly built in the 18th and 19th centuries. Finnish National Board of Antiquities has named the church and old town area as national built heritage.

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Details

Founded: 1443-1462
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aleksandr Haikara (4 years ago)
Ok
Marko M (4 years ago)
Naantalin keskiaikainen kivikirkko on aina omanlaisensa nähtävyys, onhan se Turun Tuomiokirkon jälkeen toiseksi suurin keskiaikainen kivikirkkomme. Alunperin kirkko rakennettiin kirkonmäellä sijainneen katolisen Birgittalaisluostarin kirkoksi. Luostarin rakennukset purettiin jo 1600-luvulla kuninkaan määräyksestä, mutta kirkko onneksi on edelleen pystyssä. Harmillisesti osuttiin juuri Naantalin musiikkijuhlien aikaan paikalle, ja soittajien harjoittelun vuoksi lähempi sisäkuvaaminen jäi edelleen odottamaan hamaan tulevaisuuteen.
jian gu (4 years ago)
As often it is, the church literally takes the highest ground there.
Alan Pembshaw (5 years ago)
A very beautiful church set in a lovely parkland. Worth walking through the cemetry
Guillaume Jacquemet (6 years ago)
Nice little church with excellent view on the sea and the Moomin island.
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