Abbiategrasso Castle

Abbiategrasso, Italy

The Visconti Castle of Abbiategrasso lies on the axis of the Naviglio Grande canal and it was built to protect the waterway to Milan. In the 15th century it was one of the preferred places of residence of the dukes and duchesses of Milan.

The castle was probably built at the end of the 13th century on the site of a previous fortification (castro Margazario) near a Benedictine monastery. It was enlarged by Azzone Visconti (1329-1339) and Gian Galeazzo (1378-1402). In 1438 it was restored and embellished by the Duke Filippo Maria and – lost every defensive function and easily reachable by water along the Naviglio Grande – it became his favorite country mansion.

To the castle had some inclination the duchesses of Milan. Here had a stable residence Agnese del Maino, mistress of the Duke Filippo Maria and mother of Bianca Maria. The Sforza, dukes of Milan and descendants of Bianca Maria, favored the castle of Abbiategrasso to enhance their Visconti origins.

After the Visconti-Sforza period, the castle progressively assumed again the role of a stronghold, especially during the years of the Italian Wars (1494-1559). In 1658 three towers were demolished and the fourth was cut off. In 1862 it was sold to the municipality, which in the following years obliterated the ramparts to make place to the new train station, at the same time taking care of some restorations.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Barbara Corti (17 months ago)
Un luogo fuori dal tempo miracolosamente ben conservato. L'occasione per visitarlo è stato un concerto: ottima, anche l'acustica.
Alberto 57 (18 months ago)
Castello visconteo che fa parte del centro storico di Abbiategrasso. È utilizzato per eventi e spettacoli che si tengono nel cortile interno, mentre nei sotterranei vengono allestite mostre ed esposizioni. Non è grande, ma è ben tenuto, come in genere tutto il centro storico di Abbiategrasso, in cui è molto piacevole passeggiare tra palazzi d'epoca e viuzze che si aprono su scorci molto suggestivi. Da non perdere i portici di piazza Marconi, dove troverete la pasticceria di Andrea Besuschio, ultimo discendente di una famosa famiglia di pasticceri dal 1845. Abbiategrasso vale una visita.
Akinfala Akintomi Johnson (2 years ago)
Nice
Alessandro Cantoni (3 years ago)
Autumn in Castle
Massimiliano Banfi (3 years ago)
Cultura viscontea
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