Trezzo sull'Adda Castle

Trezzo sull'Adda, Italy

The Castle of Trezzo sull'Adda is located on a hill within a bend of the Adda river and from this protected on two sides. On the remaining side it is closed by a wall and a 42-meter high tower. Part of the castle was the fortified bridge over the river, destroyed in 1416.

The site was inhabited since prehistoric time by Celtic populations and after the VII century hosted a Longobard settlement, which was also at the origin of the first fortification on the hill. In 1370 Bernabò Visconti, lord of Milan, ordered the construction of a new caste, which was built on the remains of the previous fortress and completed in 1377.

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Founded: 1370
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elisa Rossetti (2 years ago)
Guided tour during the Ville Aperte week. Very interesting. On a clear day, the view from the tower is breath taking and stretches even to Milan
Valentijn Vergote (2 years ago)
Beautiful view of the river Adda from the castle garden.
Paul Knight (3 years ago)
Trezzo is always a beautiful place to visit.
phil brown (5 years ago)
Excellent. Worth the view to go up the tower. Price is very reasonable at 3 EUR per adult (small children free). 260 steps later on a clear day you will have the spectacular view of the adda valley. I would recommend to go at sun down on a clear day and watch the sun go down. Wonderful. Staff are also very friendly and helpful
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