Cuasso Castle Ruins

Cuasso al Monte, Italy

Known as Castelasc in Lombard local language, the Castle of Cuasso is one of the most important defensive buildings in the province of Varese and Insubria. Founded in medieval times, it stands upon a hill which gives name to the whole city of Cuasso al Monte. Nowadays only ruins remain of the ancient structure.

Due to the lack of written sources, the history of the castle is still, in some respects, mysterious. The few studies and on-site digs have found out that it was built close to an ancient road that connected Milan to the alpine passages of San Bernardino Pass and Gotthard Pass. Its building on top of a gorge made the fortress impossible to seize. Its closeness to the river Cavallizza, which flows through an area rich in silver, lead and gold, could also suggest that it played a preeminent role in controlling the managing of the mineral wealth of the region.

The castle was built in many different stages. The most ancient tower, which dates back to Roman times, was enlarged during the Lombard age. Some believe that it was built by a Saxon workforce. Paul the Deacon, in his book Historia Langobardorum, records about 20,000 Saxons, who followed king Alboin in spring 568. The Saxons descended from the same ancestors, as both people had lived in Roman Germany during the first century A.D, in the area around the river Elbe. In 734 a part of 20,000 Arimannia left Italy, as they strongly disagreed with the Lombards' power. So, the Castle was surely a military defense of the road that connected Como and the Gotthard: in fact, before the bridge of Melide was built, the main road ran through it.

Later it was part of the Seprio's County, and it was permanently abandoned in the 13th century. Until the mid 16th century the castle of Cuasso housed the local parish; then, during the following centuries, it was used as a cemetery. Finally, the castle was brought back to its function of observation tower when the Cadorna Line was built.

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Details

Founded: 8th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Gabriele Ca (2 years ago)
Bel posto
Alessandro De Magistris (2 years ago)
Una lunga storia, quella di questo luogo, che più che un castello, è una torre di avvistamento di epoca romana, attorniata da resti di insediamento militare di secoli. I primi scavi per liberare queste mura dalla vegetazione dilagante furono avviati nei primi anni '70 del secolo scorso, venne pubblicato anche un bel libricino che ne evidenziava la storia e l' uso nei secoli, con esaustive foto degli scavi effettuati e dei ritrovamenti. Poi più nulla fino fino a circa una decina di anni fa, nel frattempo la vegetazione riprese il possesso del luogo ammalorando ulteriormente i pochi resti. Il proprietario del terreno in cui si trovano i resti volle restaurarlo secondo disegni storici, cercando di riportarlo a nuovi fasti, ma la soprintendenza negò l' intervento, così come lo vedrete è ciò che resta della totale incuria, delle istituzioni cieche ad ogni sorta di buone intenzioni. Per arrivarci seguire le indicazioni Cava Bonomi, ed addentrarsi poi a piedi nei sentieri boschivi.
marcello cistoldi (3 years ago)
Da vedere assolutamente...
Matteo D'Antuono (3 years ago)
Luogo interessante e dal grande fascino storico, è stato ben recintato per preservarlo da eventuale vandalismo. Mi sono informato per poterlo visitare (ci sono i contatti sui cartelli lungo la recinzione) ma purtroppo non ho più ricevuto risposta e mi dispiace, presumo diano priorità a scuole od associazioni invece che ai singoli privati. Dall'esterno si vede qualcosa, ma poterlo visitare è sicuramente tutt'altra storia.
Rosi Iudicelli (4 years ago)
Luoghi affascinanti. Ho visto il castello dal viale che porta alla cava Bonomi. In autunno i colori sono straordinari!
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