Gnandstein Castle

Gnandstein, Germany

Gnandstein castle was built in the Romanesque style in the 13th century, probably only with a rectangular groundplan and a residential tower. Parts of the present building still date from this early period. The external walls were extended several times.

During the Thirty Years' War the castle was attacked by Swedish troops and partly destroyed. Shortly before the end of the war the south wing burned down after being struck by lightning. 

The well house is more than 33 meters high, giving the visitor a broader view of the region. It was used as a watch tower. Guided tours are available.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Grill (3 years ago)
Als Besucher aus Schwaben habe ich die Besichtigung genossen. Die Damen am Empfang waren sehr freundlich und hilfsbereit. Schade, dass das Mittelalter spektal hauptsächlich am Samstag war, meine beiden Schwestern, die in Ramsdorf leben, und ich waren am Sonntag in der Burg. Schöne Themenzimmer,netter Burghof mit leckeren Speisen.
voiceoj (3 years ago)
Schön gepflegte Burganlage mit Hotel Restaurant & Café. Idyllisch und ländlich gelegen, findet der Besucher hier einen wunderschönen Erholungsort vor. Für Hochzeiten bieten sich die historischen Räumlichkeiten, in den Sommermonaten zusätzlich die Panoramaterrasse und der Arkadenburghof an.
John Bok (3 years ago)
Krásný hrad v pěkné krajině. Vyhlídka z věže úžasná. Expozice zajímavá - nádherná gotická kaple.
Ryan Kriste (4 years ago)
Beautiful castle. We got married here. Great food and beer in the restaurant.
Unbezwingbar (4 years ago)
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