St. Thomas Church

Leipzig, Germany

St. Thomas Church is associated with a number of well-known composers such as Richard Wagner and Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, but mostly with Johann Sebastian Bach who worked here as a Kapellmeister (music director) from 1723 until his death in 1750. Today, the church also holds his remains. Martin Luther preached here in 1539.

There has been a church at the current site of the Thomaskirche at least since the 12th century. Foundations of a Romanesque building have been discovered in the choir and crossing of the current church. Between 1212 and 1222 the earlier structure became the church of the new St. Thomas Monastery (Stift) of the Augustinian order.

The current building was consecrated by Thilo of Trotha, the Bishop of Merseburg, on 10 April 1496. The reformer Martin Luther preached here on Pentecost Sunday in 1539. The monastic buildings were demolished in 1541 following the monastery's dissolution. The current church tower was first built in 1537 and rebuilt in 1702. Chapels added in the 17th century and an ante-building along the northern front of the nave with two stairways were removed at the end of the 19th century.

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Details

Founded: 1496
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jake Y (2 years ago)
Beautiful church in down town Leipzig featuring the art and music of Bach. Bach museum located right next door. Great place to visit for music, food, tours, and general relaxation. Inside of the church is historic and full of iconic art and architecture. Make this part if your trip to Leipzig.
Alexandra Atanasiu (2 years ago)
There is a great church where you can see the tomb of Johann Sebastian Bach and the whole area it's called after his name and you can enjoy a delicious coffee just next to the church with an amazing view of his statue.
Rusty Travelboy Rob (2 years ago)
Beautiful church with often available choir practice listening-in. This place has strong cultural significance for Leipzig. Plenty of info material available - look out this place can get crowded on busy days.
Pedro Eguiguren (2 years ago)
Very nice church. The Bach Choir plays here every now and then. You have a very small Museum displaying some instruments played by the orchestra under Johan Sebastian Bach. It has 2 organs with beautiful sound. You can check the schedule and plan to go when the choir sings or when they have mass with the organ playing.
Paul Beckman (2 years ago)
A beautiful building commemorating the greatest western musical genius in history. It's best to visit and take in one of the concerts on Friday or Saturday, or to attend a Sunday service. The choir and musicians are always excellent, but be warned that the place is usually packed.
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