Leipzig New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus) is the seat of the Leipzig city administration since 1905. It stands within the Leipzig's 'ring road' on the southwest corner opposite the city library at Martin-Luther-Ring. The main tower is, at 114.8 meters, the tallest city hall tower in Germany.

In 1895 the city of Leipzig was granted the site of the Pleissenburg by the Kingdom of Saxony to build a new town hall. A competition was held for architectural designs with the specification that the Rapunzel tower silhouette of the Pleißenburg be retained. In 1897 the architect and city building director of Leipzig Hugo Licht was awarded the job of designing it.

The foundation stone of the New Town Hall was laid on 19 October 1899. The town hall was built in the style of historicism.

The hall is notable as the location of numerous mass suicides during the final days of the Third Reich.

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Founded: 1899
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mariann Rasmussen (11 months ago)
Closed in week-ends. Not good when you are tourist and only in Leipzig in week-ends.
Egor Sorokin (12 months ago)
I would say this the best and the most luxury Rathaus I have ever seen in Germany.
Alexandr Orlov (2 years ago)
This town hall looks like a small historical fortress in the middle of a modern city. Monolithic and at the same time figuratively elegant. I was always impressed and pleased whenever I met old buildings that still play a role in the new era, instead of just decaying and withering. This is a very beautiful building.
stefan norell (2 years ago)
Impressive building with a great Tower that can be visited at 14.00 daily, the guided tower tour costs 3 euro för adults. A cool place with a great view oftast the city
Planet Airlines (3 years ago)
Standing majestically at the southwest corner of Leipzig's Old Town is the New Town Hall, Neues Rathaus, in the style of the German Late Renaissance. Completed in 1905, this massive building occupies the site of the 13th Century Pleissenburg, with parts of the old castle being incorporated in the 115 meter high central tower.
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