New Town Hall

Leipzig, Germany

Leipzig New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus) is the seat of the Leipzig city administration since 1905. It stands within the Leipzig's 'ring road' on the southwest corner opposite the city library at Martin-Luther-Ring. The main tower is, at 114.8 meters, the tallest city hall tower in Germany.

In 1895 the city of Leipzig was granted the site of the Pleissenburg by the Kingdom of Saxony to build a new town hall. A competition was held for architectural designs with the specification that the Rapunzel tower silhouette of the Pleißenburg be retained. In 1897 the architect and city building director of Leipzig Hugo Licht was awarded the job of designing it.

The foundation stone of the New Town Hall was laid on 19 October 1899. The town hall was built in the style of historicism.

The hall is notable as the location of numerous mass suicides during the final days of the Third Reich.

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Details

Founded: 1899
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Venula Tharusha (2 years ago)
Leipzig New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus) is the seat of the Leipzig city administration since 1905. It stands within the Leipzig's "ring road" on the southwest corner opposite the city library at Martin-Luther-Ring. The main tower is, at 114.8 meters, the tallest city hall tower in Germany. At the end of the nineteenth century, the Old Town Hall located at the marketplace finally proved too small for the booming city. In 1895 the city of Leipzig was granted the site of the Pleissenburg by the Kingdom of Saxony to build a new town hall. A competition was held for architectural designs with the specification that the Rapunzel tower silhouette of the Pleißenburg be retained. In 1897 the architect and city building director of Leipzig Hugo Licht was awarded the job of designing it. The foundation stone of the New Town Hall was laid on 19 October 1899. The town hall was built in the style of historicism. The hall is notable as the location of numerous mass suicides during the final days of the Third Reich. The Israeli author Yosef Agnon (Nobel Prize in Literature, 1966) describes in the second chapter of his novel "In Mr. Lublin's Store", how the nameless first-person narrator, a young jewish man from Galicia, haunted in 1915 the authoritative new town hall for obtaining a residence permit in Leipzig. The town hall features as a backdrop in the Alfred Hitchcock film Torn Curtain.
Binxu748er (2 years ago)
Came here for research purposes. Conducted pressure measurements from the top of the tower. The town hall in itself is beautiful from both the inside and the outside. Sadly the paternoster lift was out of order. The view from the top is great.
antonios varzakis (2 years ago)
Leipzig New Town Hall (Neues Rathaus) is the seat of the Leipzig city administration since 1905. It stands within the Leipzig's "ring road" on the southwest corner opposite the city library at Martin-Luther-Ring. The main tower is, at 114.8 meters, the tallest city hall tower in Germany. In 1897 the architect and city building director of Leipzig Hugo Licht was awarded the job of designing it. The foundation stone of the New Town Hall was laid on 19 October 1899 The town hall features as a backdrop in the Alfred Hitchcock film Torn Curtain. The Deputy Mayor of Leipzig and his wife and daughter, who committed suicide as American troops were entering the city on 20 April 1945.
stefan norell (3 years ago)
Impressive building with a great Tower that can be visited at 14.00 daily, the guided tower tour costs 3 euro for adults. A cool place with a great view of the city?
Pranav Kedia (3 years ago)
Really beautiful and magnificent building in the center of the city.
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